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Die Heuning Pot Literature Guide
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Analysis


Symbols, Imagery, Wordplay

Form and Meter

Let's get one thing straight right off the bat: a slant rhyme is a rhyme that isn't full or perfect (cat and hat are examples of a perfect rhyme). This entire poem is made up of slant rhyme. Look a...

Speaker

Owen dishes out a two-for-one in this poem—and you don't even need a coupon. That's right: there are two speakers for the price of one. The first speaker is rumored to be based on Owen himself, w...

Setting

Let's just be straight up about it: this poem takes place in Hell. Owen doesn't tell us that right away. He opens by describing the tunnel that the speaker has fallen through, a tunnel that had bee...

Sound Check

If there's a poetry equivalent to the soundtrack of the descent into hell, this is it. Oh wait, maybe Dante's Inferno already cornered the market on that one, but "Strange Meeting" isn't too s...

What's Up With the Title?

Strange indeed. Wilfred Owen might have made the understatement of the century when he called this one "Strange Meeting." As a first impression, it doesn't give too much away and sets a sort of mys...

Calling Card

We know that Wilfred Owen wrote most of his poetry in a short period of time all while fighting in the horrific battles of WWI. We're no psychologists, but it's pretty plain to see that all of that...

Tough-o-Meter

In these packed 44 lines, Owen really highlights his masterful ability to hint at something without saying it outright. This creates some very exciting tension and suspense for us as readers—as w...

Trivia

What do Prince William and Wilfred Owen have in common? They're both Welshman. (Source.) Wilfred Owen met his friend and fellow poet, Siegfried Sassoon, in a hospital while he was recovering from w...

Steaminess Rating

If there were something less than G we'd give it to this poem. There's nothing less romantic and sexy than an eternity in hell.
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