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A Tale of Two Cities

A Tale of Two Cities

  

by Charles Dickens

A Tale of Two Cities Suffering Quotes

How we cite our quotes: Citations follow this format: (Volume.Chapter.Paragraph)

Quote #10

"I am not afraid to die, Citizen Evrémonde, but I have done nothing. I am not unwilling to die, if the Republic which is to do so much good to us poor, will profit by my death; but I do not know how that can be, Citizen Evrémonde. Such a poor weak little creature!" (3.13.85)

The innocence and anguish of a young seamstress becomes the ultimate symbol of the failure of the revolution. If youth and innocence can be abolished by the revolutionary fervor that sweeps the country, what hope do the revolutionaries have for crafting a better society than the one that they overthrew?