A Tale of Two Cities
A Tale of Two Cities
by Charles Dickens
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A Tale of Two Cities Volume III, Chapter Thirteen – Fifty-two Summary

  • In his room in the prison, Charles counts off the hours until his death.
  • He thinks constantly of Lucie. Finally, he writes letters to Lucie, her father, and Mr. Lorry.
  • Then he paces the room, counting off the last hours of his life.
  • He knows that at three he’ll be summoned to the carriage which will take him to the guillotine.
  • At one, however, Charles hears footsteps approaching.
  • Sydney walks into the room.
  • He’s got a pressing request for Charles: he doesn’t have time to explain why he’s asking for the things he needs.
  • Startled, Charles does what Sydney asks. They change boots, hair-ties, and shirts.
  • Charles begins to understand Sydney’s plan, but he’s certain that it won’t work.
  • Speaking rapidly, Sydney asks Charles to sit down and write a letter that he’ll dictate.
  • Charles complies.
  • Sydney tells him to write an unaddressed letter saying that the time has come for him to make good on the promise he once gave.
  • He knows that the reader won’t forget the promise. He wants her to be assured that he’s glad that his time has come.
  • Puzzled, Charles stops writing. He thinks he smells a strange vapor.
  • He starts up to rip the bottle out of Sydney’s hand, but Sydney’s too quick for him.
  • Charles slumps to the ground, drugged.
  • Sydney calls Barsad, who drags Charles out of the jail.
  • They place Charles on a stretcher, and Barsad carries him away.
  • At two, a jailer comes into the room and calls for Evrémonde. Sydney follows him.
  • He gets into a line with fifty-one other prisoners, all of whom are scheduled to die.
  • They board carts that will carry them to the guillotine.
  • Sydney stands next to a young seamstress who stares at him passionately.
  • She knows Charles; she was with him in La Force.
  • She says that she wouldn’t be afraid to die for the Republic…but she can’t understand how the death of an insignificant, innocent woman can matter at all.
  • All of a sudden, she realizes that Sydney isn’t Charles.
  • Startled, asks if Sydney is dying for Charles.
  • He says he’s dying for Charles’ wife and child.
  • The seamstress asks to hold the hand of the "brave stranger" as they ride to the guillotine.
  • Meanwhile, the Manettes and Mr. Lorry are going through the checkpoints out of town.
  • Anxiously, they watch as guards check and re-check all their papers.
  • Soon, however, the carriage is flying out of Paris.
  • When they get out to a village, they’re stopped again.
  • Nervous, Mr. Lorry asks what the holdup is.
  • It turns out that the guards just want to know how many people are being fed to La Guillotine today.
  • The answer is fifty-two.
  • Satisfied, the guards let the carriage roll off into the night.

Next Page: Volume III, Chapter Fourteen – The Knitting Done
Previous Page: Volume III, Chapter Twelve – Darkness

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