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The Awakening

The Awakening

  

by Kate Chopin

The Awakening Marriage Quotes

How we cite our quotes: Citations follow this format: (Chapter.Paragraph)

Quote #10

Before dinner in the evening Edna wrote a charming letter to her husband, telling him of her intention to move for a while into the little house around the block, and to give a farewell dinner before leaving, regretting that he was not there to share it, to help out with the menu and assist her in entertaining the guests. Her letter was brilliant and brimming with cheerfulness. (26.44)

Edna remains courteous to her husband and on friendly terms, but she no longer relies on him financially or obeys his every command.

Quote #11

Edna felt depressed rather than soothed after leaving them. The little glimpse of domestic harmony which had been offered her, gave her no regret, no longing. It was not a condition of life which fitted her, and she could see in it but an appalling and hopeless ennui. She was moved by a kind of commiseration for Madame Ratignolle,– a pity for that colorless existence which never uplifted its possessor beyond the region of blind contentment, in which no moment of anguish ever visited her soul, in which she would never have the taste of life's delirium. (18.23)

Even after witnessing the "ideal couple" who have what seems to be a happy marriage, Edna walks away convinced that marriage is stagnant and boring state.

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