unigo_skin
© 2014 Shmoop University, Inc. All rights reserved.
 

Quotes

Quote #1

"Coming back to dinner?" his wife called after him. He halted a moment and shrugged his shoulders. He felt in his vest pocket; there was a ten-dollar bill there. He did not know; perhaps he would return for the early dinner and perhaps he would not. It all depended upon the company which he found over at Klein's and the size of "the game." He did not say this, but she understood it, and laughed, nodding good-by to him. (1.17)

Mr. Pontellier is under no obligation to answer to his wife. He does as he pleases.

Quote #2

It was eleven o'clock that night when Mr. Pontellier returned from Klein's hotel. He was in an excellent humor, in high spirits, and very talkative. His entrance awoke his wife, who was in bed and fast asleep when he came in. He talked to her while he undressed, telling her anecdotes and bits of news and gossip that he had gathered during the day. From his trousers pockets he took a fistful of crumpled bank notes and a good deal of silver coin, which he piled on the bureau indiscriminately with keys, knife, handkerchief, and whatever else happened to be in his pockets. She was overcome with sleep, and answered him with little half utterances.

He thought it very discouraging that his wife, who was the sole object of his existence, evinced so little interest in things which concerned him, and valued so little his conversation. (3.1 – 3.2)

Mr. Pontellier is irritated when his wife is not available to please him at all hours. In this passage, his demand that she pay attention to him is completely unreasonable – the woman is sleeping!

Quote #3

The tears came so fast to Mrs. Pontellier's eyes that the damp sleeve of her peignoir no longer served to dry them. She was holding the back of her chair with one hand; her loose sleeve had slipped almost to the shoulder of her uplifted arm. Turning, she thrust her face, steaming and wet, into the bend of her arm, and she went on crying there, not caring any longer to dry her face, her eyes, her arms. She could not have told why she was crying. Such experiences as the foregoing were not uncommon in her married life. They seemed never before to have weighed much against the abundance of her husband's kindness and a uniform devotion which had come to be tacit and self-understood. (3.10)

Although this particular incident with her husband is not unusual, it affects Edna much more strongly because of the liberalizing nature of Grand Isle and its inhabitants. Here, Edna finally sees her husband’s kindnesses as no excuse for his blatantly authoritative behavior.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
back to top