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The Awakening

The Awakening

by Kate Chopin

Repression Quotes

How we cite our quotes:

Quote #4

Despite herself, the youngster amused her. She must have betrayed in her look some degree of interest or entertainment. The boy grew more daring, and Mrs. Pontellier might have found herself, in a little while, listening to a highly colored story but for the timely appearance of Madame Lebrun. (20.9)

Edna is definitely over her former repression. While the beginnings of such a "colored story" would have made Edna horribly uncomfortable at the start of the novel, she now clearly shows interest in hearing Victor’s story.

Quote #5

Edna cried a little that night after Arobin left her. It was only one phase of the multitudinous emotions which had assailed her. There was with her an overwhelming feeling of irresponsibility. There was the shock of the unexpected and the unaccustomed. There was her husband's reproach looking at her from the external things around her which he had provided for her external existence. There was Robert's reproach making itself felt by a quicker, fiercer, more overpowering love, which had awakened within her toward him. Above all, there was understanding. She felt as if a mist had been lifted from her eyes, enabling her to took upon and comprehend the significance of life, that monster made up of beauty and brutality. But among the conflicting sensations which assailed her, there was neither shame nor remorse. There was a dull pang of regret because it was not the kiss of love which had inflamed her, because it was not love which had held this cup of life to her lips (28.1)

Edna has overcome her former repression.

Quote #6

"Well, good-by, a jeudi," said Mr. Pontellier, as he let himself out.

The Doctor would have liked during the course of conversation to ask, "Is there any man in the case?" but he knew his Creole too well to make such a blunder as that. (22.30 - 22.31)

Doctor Mandelet restrains his real questions in deference to the mores of polite society.

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