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The Giver

The Giver

  

by Lois Lowry

Analysis: Writing Style

Plain, Clear

The Giver is a rather straightforward narrative, so you won't get bogged down in ornate language or Faulkner-like, page-long sentences. But that doesn't mean that the writing is childish or boring—it's economical, but full of imagery:

Jonas nodded. The man was wrinkled, and his eyes, though piercing in their unusual lightness, seemed tired. The flesh around them was darkened into shadowed circles.

"I can see that you are very old," Jonas responded with respect. The Old were always given the highest respect. (10.36-37)

Refreshingly, the novel tells it like it is. Or rather, tells it as it might be, in Lowry's cautionary vision of the future.

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