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Characters

Meet the Cast

Tristan

Tristan the KnightHere he is, folks. Medieval knights don't get much better than this.As a knight, Tristan is everything you could want. He's been trained by the best, and he can do it all. His dad...

Yseut the Fair

I Put a Spell on You, and Now You're MineYseut's full title, "Yseut the Fair," should tell you a little something about her. Yup: she's a knock-out. She's so drop-dead gorgeous, in fact, that even...

King Mark

Poor King Mark. All he wanted to do was marry a nice girl and live happily ever after. Or, at least, that's what his knights told him he should do, and he went along with it. How could he have gues...

Brangain

Despite her initial screw-up – giving the love potion to Tristan and Yseut by mistake – Brangain is a devoted and loyal servant to Yseut throughout the story. Even when Yseut tries to have her...

The Three Barons

Mark's three "wicked" barons, Godwin, Ganelon, and Denoalan, are the power behind the throne in the kingdom of Cornwall, and that's definitely not a good thing. When they become jealous of Tristan,...

Frocin

Frocin is the "wicked" dwarf who seems to have it in for Tristan and Yseut: it's he who leads Mark to the site of their secret meetings. He also comes up with the scheme to spread flour on the floo...

King Arthur

When Yseut decides to clear herself of the charge of adultery, she insists on having Arthur and his household witness her oath. Arthur is to serve as her "surety." That means that after witnessing...

Governal

Governal is the tutor Tristan's father employs to teach Tristan "all the warlike and peaceful arts," and he does an excellent job, if Tristan's future success as a knight and courtier is any indica...

Yseut of the White Hands

Yes, folks, that's right: this story features two Yseuts, both of them beautiful princesses who are romantically linked to Tristan. Hey, it's the twelfth century; we guess names are scarce. Anyway,...

Ogrin

The hermit Ogrin is the conscience of The Romance of Tristan. He represents the views of the Catholic Church concerning adultery, even when no one else in the story seems to consider them at all. L...
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