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The Stranger

The Stranger

  

by Albert Camus

Analysis: Narrator Point of View

Who is the narrator, can she or he read minds, and, more importantly, can we trust her or him?

First Person (Limited), Through Meursault

Come on—you thought someone as solipsistic, narcissistic, and (sure) sociopathic as Meursault would yield the narration to anyone else? This is the Meursault show, and the POV highlights this fact 100%.

Meursault is our narrator, and he tells it as he sees, feels, and thinks it. Not a hint of third-person omniscience exists... because the story is purely subjective from Meursault's point-of-view. Even though he's observant, Meursault makes no attempt to empathize with or understand the other characters. As the story progresses, we move from description laced with introspection to purely introspective recounting.

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