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The Stranger

The Stranger

  

by Albert Camus

 Table of Contents

The Stranger Symbolism, Imagery, Allegory

The Sun, Heat, and Weather

Meursault is hardly a sunny dude. But he is inordinately affected by the sunshine... and not just in the way that normal humans are. It's not like sunshine makes Meursault cheery and Seattle-e...

Colors

"Roses are red, violets are blue, sugar is sweet, and so are you."Or, in the case of Meursault: "The sky is green, anger is red, the sun is hot, and some poor Arab guy is dead."Meursault devotes si...

The Old, Odd, Robotic Woman

Official Shmoop Statement: We like robots. Robots are awesome. What is less awesome (and definitely creepier) are people that act like robots.Appearing in both Part I, Chapter Five a...

The Crucifix

It's not hard to pick out the obvious symbolism here: Christianity. But the crucifix symbolizes more than just that in this novel. It also represents the Afterlife, society's acceptance of it,...

The Courtroom

This ain't just a place where Meursault's life is on trial. The courtroom also symbolizes society's forum in The Stranger. The judge is the self-proclaimed "moral umpire," calling all the shots. Th...

Young Reporter in Courtroom

This guy appears at Meursault's trial in Part II, Chapter Three. He's a young reporter wearing gray flannels and a blue tie who studies Meursault intently with his very bright eyes... betraying exa...

Laughing and Swimming

Question: How do we know that Meursault is not, in fact, a robot? Answer: Robots can't swim.Laughing and swimming are the two actions that remind us that, in fact, Meursault actually is human being...

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