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The Windhover

The Windhover

  

by Gerard Manley Hopkins

Analysis: Allusions

When poets refer to other great works, people, and events, it’s usually not accidental. Put on your super-sleuth hat and figure out why.

Foreign Words and References

  • Line 2: "Dauphin" is the French word for the crown prince, or the person who is next in line to be king.
  • Line 11: "chevalier" is the French word for a knight. 
  • Line 12: "Sillion" is a made-up word, but it seems to be based on the French word "sillon," which is the furrow or small ditch that a plough cuts into the soil that seeds are planted into.

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