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There Is No Dog

There Is No Dog

  

by Meg Rosoff

Analysis: Allusions

When authors refer to other great works, people, and events, it’s usually not accidental. Put on your super-sleuth hat and figure out why.

Literary and Philosophical References

  • Alice in Wonderland (13.33)
  • Leda and the Swan (16.10)
  • The Abduction of Europa (16.10)
  • Gordian Knot (17.9)
  • Shakespeare (17.10)
  • St. Christopher (21.5)
  • William Congreve, The Mourning Bride (30.12)
  • King Midas (33.44)
  • Zeus and Ganymede (36.19)

Biblical References

  • Genesis 1:1 (3.1)
  • Genesis 1 (Chapter 6 follows the narrative of Genesis)
  • Isaiah 43:1 (15.4)
  • Genesis 22 (16.11)
  • Exodus 12:12 (16.10)
  • Genesis 19:26 (16.11, 46.32)
  • Exodus 3:4 (16.11)
  • Exodus 7:25–8:11‎(16.11)
  • Exodus 13:17-14:29 (16.11)
  • Exodus 24:1-11 (16.11)
  • Genesis 6-9 (21.23, 29.48, 30.15)
  • Exodus 13-17 (46.32)

Historical References

  • Bedermeier period (9.1)
  • Franz Ritter von Liszt (9.1)
  • The Battle Of Waterloo (9.1)
  • World War II (17.7)
  • First and Second Civil Wars of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (17.7)
  • The Great Inquisition (17.10)
  • Pope Urban II (18.22)
  • The Crusades (18.22)
  • Vlad III, Prince of Wallachia (28.15)

Pop Culture References

  • The International Whaling Commission (17.11)
  • The Red Cross (21.17)
  • Apocalypse Now (24.9)
  • Gene Kelly (34.7)

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