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There Is No Dog

There Is No Dog

by Meg Rosoff

There Is No Dog Analysis

Literary Devices in There Is No Dog

Symbolism, Imagery, Allegory

Setting

Most novels have modest settings: London, New York, Paris. Once in a while, they might get ambitious and use a whole country, like America or Australia. There Is No Dog skips right past all of that...

Narrator Point of View

We know everything that is going on There Is No Dog. There are no secrets, because we can hear everyone's thoughts, see what everyone is doing, and even go into the past! It's like a time machine t...

Genre

Admit it: the book is funny. That, and the deus ex machine) ending just brought it all together so there was a happy ending with Bob, Estelle, Lucy, and Luke as the perfect couples. That's classic...

Tone

Well, what do you expect from a book that describes God's creations as "very cool. They were very cool, but they didn't work" (6.1)?Even though these are some heavy subjects, Rosoff keeps the tone...

Writing Style

This book may deal with some of the biggest, hardest questions in, well, the known universe, but Rosoff makes it pretty easy on us. Check it out: "The hill is steep and he begins to run. She stops...

What's Up With the Title?

It's a joke! You probably figured out sometime in elementary school that "God" spelled backwards is "dog." By playing on that, this title refers to the phrase "there is no God" that appears in graf...

What's Up With the Epigraph?

When his life was ruined, his family killed, his farm destroyed, Job knelt down on the ground and yelled up to the heavens, 'Why God? Why me?' and the thundering voice of God answered, 'There's jus...

What's Up With the Ending?

Lucy's face transforms and lightens, quick as a child's. "Oh, clever you," she cries. For an instant her unhappiness evaporates. It will return, but for now she throws her arms round him, wondering...

Tough-o-Meter

We know our Shmoopsters are the best and the brightest, so There Is No Dog should be a piece of cake. After all, half of the plot is a love story—not too complicated, right? The writing isn't goi...

Plot Analysis

Mama Always Said, Stupid is as Stupid DoesLet's set the scene for you. Hot blonde, Lucy, who wants to be in love. Lazy, lecherous, idiotic, teenage God, Bob. He wants to have sex with the hot blond...

Booker's Seven Basic Plots Analysis

Initial ConfusionThere is a lot of confusion going on here. Bob thinks that he is in love with Lucy, even though she is a mortal and he's just horny. Mr. B has no idea what he's supposed to be doin...

Three-Act Plot Analysis

Lucy wants to be in love, and God (aka Bob) is happy to oblige. Even though he is a lazy good-for-nothing, Bob knows how to seduce a lady. (Not to mention, turn into a giant, rapist animal if she d...

Trivia

Now, we aren't calling Rosoff a copycat, but Bob certainly bears a whole lot of resemblance to this J. R. "Bob" Dobbs guy. Could it be him? He is quite handsome. (source) Rosoff started writing bec...

Steaminess Rating

There is a whole lot of drunkenness and sexual suggestion in this novel. Like, from the first page we're pretty sure that someone's going to get it on. Even the clouds are "tipsy." We get chapters...

Allusions

Alice in Wonderland (13.33)Leda and the Swan (16.10)The Abduction of Europa (16.10)Gordian Knot (17.9)Shakespeare (17.10)St. Christopher (21.5)William Congreve, The Mourning Bride (30.12)King Midas...

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