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There Is No Dog Theme of Lust

If there's one lesson that human history has to offer, it's that people will do a lot for just a little bit of sex. Well, the gods are no different. Bob seems willing to destroy the whole earth for some sex in There Is No Dog. Not only that, but he doesn't even know if what he is feeling is love or lust. What's the difference? We wish we knew.

Questions About Lust

  1. What is the difference between love and lust in this novel? Is there a difference?
  2. Are humans the only creatures In There Is No Dog that experience lust? If not, what other ones do?
  3. What is the pattern of all of Bob's relationships with human women? How do they end? How do they begin? How does Bob treat them?

Chew on This

Try on an opinion or two, start a debate, or play the devil’s advocate.

Rosoff suggests that, unlike love, lust is not a universal feeling.

There Is No Dog suggests that lust is basically a negative force in human relationships.

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