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The Three Musketeers

The Three Musketeers

  

by Alexandre Dumas

The Three Musketeers Pride Quotes

How we cite our quotes: Citations follow this format: (Chapter.Paragraph)

Quote #7

Athos and D’Artagnan, with the activity of two soldiers and the knowledge of two connoisseurs, hardly required three hours to purchase the entire equipment of the Musketeer. Besides, Athos was very easy, and a noble to his fingers’ ends. When a thing suited him he paid the price demanded, without thinking to ask for any abatement. D’Artagnan would have remonstrated at this; but Athos put his hand upon his shoulder, with a smile, and D’Artagnan understood that it was all very well for such a little Gascon gentleman as himself to drive a bargain, but not for a man who had the bearing of a prince. (38.133)

Here we see pride intersecting with class and with money. Although Athos isn’t exactly rich, he would never stoop to bargaining for his purchases because of his position as an aristocrat.

Quote #8

Planchet, very proud of being raised to the dignity of maitre d’hotêl, thought he would make all ready, like an intelligent man; and with this view called in the assistance of the lackey of one of his master’s guests, named Fourreau, and the false soldier who had tried to kill D’Artagnan and who, belonging to no corps, had entered into the service of D’Artagnan, or rather of Planchet, after D’Artagnan had saved his life. (42.10)

Lackeys also have their pride, but in a very different way from gentlemen. What are other instances in which the lackeys in the book exhibit pride in their work?

Quote #9

He has deceived her in her love, humbled her in her pride, thwarted her in her ambition; and now he ruins her fortune, deprives her of liberty, and even threatens her life. Still more, he has lifted the corner of her mask--that shield with which she covered herself and which rendered her so strong. (52.4)

Here at last Milady has found an adversary stronger and smarter than she is.

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