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Themes

In the world of The Three Musketeers, gentlemen are typically very proud and do not take insults lightly. A casual misunderstanding frequently results in a duel; in order to preserve their pride men will fight to the death. Wounded pride is not always so easily resolved, however, and the desire for vengeance is one of the driving engines of the novel.

Questions About Pride

  1. At first, D’Artagnan’s pride is portrayed comically since he shoots death-glares at everyone who laughs at his ridiculous horse. What are the other ways pride is portrayed in the novel?
  2. Athos is too proud to take money from the man he killed, and D’Artagnan is too proud to accept money from the Duke of Buckingham. Porthos and Aramis, meanwhile, freely accept money from their mistresses. Is there a relationship between pride and money?
  3. Is pride a positive or negative force in the novel? You might want to think about how pride is the cause of many fights and lies in the novel and balance that against its rather glorious portrayal.

Chew on This

Try on an opinion or two, start a debate, or play the devil’s advocate.

Athos is by far the proudest of the four friends.

The Cardinal’s pride is responsible for his attack on La Rochelle.

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