Die Heuning Pot Literature Guide
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Quotes

Quote #7

This was too much for the procurator’s wife; she doubted not there was an intrigue between this lady and Porthos. If she had been a great lady she would have fainted; but as she was only a procurator’s wife, she contented herself saying to the musketeer with concentrated fury, "Eh, Monsieur Porthos, you don’t offer me any holy water?" (29.23)

Ladies of high birth faint when they’re angry. Ladies like the lawyer’s wife open their mouths. Just another one of the differences that distinguish nobles from commoners in this society.

Quote #8

D’Artagnan looked at the two women, one after the other, and was forced to acknowledge that in his opinion dame Nature had made a mistake in their formation. To the great lady she had given a heart vile and venal; to the soubrette she had given the heart of a duchess. (35.4)

Qualities of kindness and inner beauty are not restricted to queens and noble ladies. D’Artagnan recognizes this yet, as we see later, cannot stop falling in love with Milady instead of her maid.

Quote #9

Athos and D’Artagnan, with the activity of two soldiers and the knowledge of two connoisseurs, hardly required three hours to purchase the entire equipment of the Musketeer. Besides, Athos was very easy, and a noble to his fingers’ ends. When a thing suited him he paid the price demanded, without thinking to ask for any abatement. D’Artagnan would have remonstrated at this; but Athos put his hand upon his shoulder, with a smile, and D’Artagnan understood that it was all very well for such a little Gascon gentleman as himself to drive a bargain, but not for a man who had the bearing of a prince. (38.133)

Here we see pride intersecting with class and with money. Although Athos isn’t exactly rich, he would never stoop to bargaining for his purchases because of his position as an aristocrat.

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