unigo_skin
© 2014 Shmoop University, Inc. All rights reserved.
 
Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey, on Revisiting the Banks of the Wye during a Tour, July 13, 1798

Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey, on Revisiting the Banks of the Wye during a Tour, July 13, 1798

Quotes

Quote #4

we are laid asleep
In body, and become a living soul (45-46)

The speaker's trance-like state allows him to become more spiritually awakened. His body is irrelevant, and he "become[s] a living soul."

Quote #5

While with an eye made quiet by the power
Of harmony, and the deep power of joy,
We see into the life of things. (47-49)

The harmony, or beautiful balance, that the speaker remembers in the "beauteous forms" makes his "eye" "quiet." He's not distracted by his physical surroundings. There could also be a pun in these lines. His physical "eye" is "made quiet," but so is his "I". His sense of himself, or his ego, is quieted. He can see beyond himself when he's in this meditative state.

Quote #6

And I have felt
A presence that disturbs me with the joy
Of elevated thoughts; a sense sublime
Of something far more deeply interfused, (93-96)

The speaker has learned to sense a "presence" in nature. It's awe-inspiring, but it's also "disturb[ing]." Why "disturb[ing]" if it fills him with "joy"? Maybe because it's so "sublime" – so great and so incomprehensible – that he has trouble processing it. That could be "disturb[ing]."

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
back to top