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Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey, on Revisiting the Banks of the Wye during a Tour, July 13, 1798

Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey, on Revisiting the Banks of the Wye during a Tour, July 13, 1798

  

by William Wordsworth

Analysis: Calling Card

Nature lovers make good poets

A lot of Wordsworth's poetry is concerned with the relationship individuals have with nature. Like the speaker in "Tintern Abbey," all individuals have the potential to reach a transcendental understanding of the "presence" in nature that binds everything together and "rolls through all things" (102). One good way to accelerate the learning curve, Wordsworth suggests, is by reading more of his poetry. No wonder his books sold so well!

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