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To My Dear and Loving Husband

To My Dear and Loving Husband

by Anne Bradstreet

To My Dear and Loving Husband Analysis

Symbols, Imagery, Wordplay

Form and Meter

Nice and RhythmicWhen you read this poem aloud, it's hard not to notice that you've fallen into a rhythm pretty quick. That's because "To My Dear and Loving Husband" is written in iambic pentameter...

Speaker

Imagine a woman you've known all your life has just gotten married. You were at the wedding, and you could tell she was really happy. Well, now it's a few days later, and she's still glowing. You s...

Setting

We really don't get any clues for the setting of the poem. In our "Sound Check," we suggested that these sound like wedding vows, but we feel like our lady isn't writing this (or reading it) at our...

Sound Check

Sometimes at weddings the bride and groom write their own vows. Frequently, people say things like "my dear Amelia, you are my everything" or "my beloved Bill, I can't imagine myself going through...

What's Up With the Title?

"To My Dear and Loving Husband" is exactly that: a poem addressed to Anne Bradstreet's "dear and loving husband." This is actually, however, a very neat title. The word "dear" refers to the speaker...

Calling Card

Anne Bradstreet really loved her husband. She loved him so much that she wrote several poems about him. In addition to "To My Dear and Loving Husband," there is "A Letter to Her Husband Absent Upon...

Tough-o-Meter

"To My Dear and Loving Husband" is a pretty straightforward poem. Often, words are left out (the second halves of the first two lines come to mind) and sometimes the claims seem strange (especially...

Trivia

Anne Bradstreet's father was instrumental in the founding of Harvard University. He signed the charter for the school while governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Now we see where Anne gets her...

Steaminess Rating

"To My Dear and Loving Husband" is all about love and passion, but it's not a sexual passion (maybe it is, but she doesn't talk about it). The poem's religious bent (see "Religion") would make anyt...

Allusions

The Book of Genesis (1-4)Simon Bradstreet, husband to the poet (throughout)
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