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Themes

Tom Sawyer isn't such a fan of Sunday school, and it's easy to see that Mark Twain sympathizes with the boy. Religion in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer isn't exactly appealing. We see it in the form of boring sermons and tedious Bible verse memorization. Outside of church, however, when things get rough, Tom and his boys can dig deep down and find some faith. Sure, a lot of the religious scenes in the book are comic, but there's some real feeling in there as well.

Questions About Religion

  1. Twain's take on religion is certainly irreverent, but can it be called disparaging?
  2. Should we read anything more into the funeral scene? Can a case be made for some kind of deeper meaning or symbolism?
  3. What point is Twain trying to get across in the "revival" episode?

Chew on This

Try on an opinion or two, start a debate, or play the devil’s advocate.

Tom Sawyer, though a poor student of the Bible, exemplifies a number of Christian principles through his actions.

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