From 11:00PM PDT on Friday, July 1 until 5:00AM PDT on Saturday, July 2, the Shmoop engineering elves will be making tweaks and improvements to the site. That means Shmoop will be unavailable for use during that time. Thanks for your patience!
We have changed our privacy policy. In addition, we use cookies on our website for various purposes. By continuing on our website, you consent to our use of cookies. You can learn about our practices by reading our privacy policy.
© 2016 Shmoop University, Inc. All rights reserved.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

  

by Mark Twain

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer Theme of Religion

Tom Sawyer isn't such a fan of Sunday school, and it's easy to see that Mark Twain sympathizes with the boy. Religion in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer isn't exactly appealing. We see it in the form of boring sermons and tedious Bible verse memorization. Outside of church, however, when things get rough, Tom and his boys can dig deep down and find some faith. Sure, a lot of the religious scenes in the book are comic, but there's some real feeling in there as well.

Questions About Religion

  1. Twain's take on religion is certainly irreverent, but can it be called disparaging?
  2. Should we read anything more into the funeral scene? Can a case be made for some kind of deeper meaning or symbolism?
  3. What point is Twain trying to get across in the "revival" episode?

Chew on This

Try on an opinion or two, start a debate, or play the devil’s advocate.

Tom Sawyer, though a poor student of the Bible, exemplifies a number of Christian principles through his actions.

People who Shmooped this also Shmooped...

Advertisement