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The Tyger

The Tyger

by William Blake

The Tyger Symbolism, Imagery, & Allegory

There’s more to a poem than meets the eye.

"The Tyger"

The symbol of the Tyger is one of the two central mysteries of the poem (the other being the Tyger’s creator). It is unclear what it exactly symbolizes, but scholars have hypothesized that th...

"Wings"

Line 7: Wings are what the creator uses to "aspire" to the creation of the Tyger. Essentially, they are the power or inspiration that allows the creator to "dare" go about the task of creating the...

Smith Tools ("Hammer," "chain," "furnace," "anvil")

Stanza 4: In the poem, these tools make up an extended metaphor of the creator and his creation of the Tyger. A blacksmith uses these tools to make objects out of super-hot metal. The word "forge"...

"The Lamb"

Line 20: When you read the word "lamb," always first think: symbol of Jesus Christ ("the Lamb of God"). As the tradition holds, animals such as lambs were sacrificed to God or gods in general until...

Body Parts (hands, eyes, shoulders, feet)

The body parts referenced in this poem – hands, eyes, shoulders, and feet – are examples of synecdoche. Synecdoche is when a part of something is used to refer to the whole thing. For example,...

Fire

The fire serves multiple purposes as an extended metaphor. First, it’s often associated with the Tyger, which contributes to the Tyger’s ferocity and sublimity (the fact it’s big,...

Apostrophe

Apostrophe is when the speaker talks directly to someone who isn’t there or something that can’t actually be talked to, such as the Tyger. The whole poem is addressed to the Tyger. Can...
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