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Die Heuning Pot Literature Guide
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Analysis


Symbolism, Imagery, Wordplay

Welcome to the land of symbols, imagery, and wordplay. Before you travel any further, please know that there may be some thorny academic terminology ahead. Never fear, Shmoop is here. Check out our...

Form and Meter

RhymeLet's start with the rhyme. Poe likes to play around with his poetic techniques, so nothing ever stays quite the same from stanza to stanza. Still, he's working off a basic pattern. Let's s...

Speaker

If you've read some other Poe poetry, like "The Raven" or "Annabel Lee," the speaker of "Ulalume" probably seems familiar: he's another guy who is miserable since the woman he loves is dead. (Mayb...

Setting

From the beginning of "Ulalume," Poe is pretty specific about the setting: It was hard by the dim lake of Auber, In the misty mid region of Weir— It was down by the dank tarn of Auber,...

Sound Check

We think this poem has an eerie, echoey sound to it. Part of this has to do with the rhyme scheme: each stanza has two end rhyme sounds that repeat. In the first stanza, the rhymes are what we li...

What's Up With the Title?

Poe has a pretty long history of naming stories and poems after beautiful dead girls. There's Lenore (from "The Raven"), Annabel Lee, Ligeia, etc. So, on the face of it a title like "Ulalume" is...

Calling Card

As far as recognizable voices in American literature go, it's pretty tough to do much better than Edgar Allan Poe. He uses a core set of themes and techniques again and again. Now, not all of his...

Tough-o-Meter

The sounds and the sights in this poem are pretty gripping. The main story is direct and exciting too. There are a few spots where you're bound to feel a little lost (we know we did), especially...

Trivia

Poe's college career didn't go according to plan.  In fact, he was forced to drop out of the University of Virginia because of gambling debts, and he eventually joined the army instead (source...

Steaminess Rating

Well, there's no actual sex here. Still, there's always just a hint of a creepy/sexy vibe in Poe, so you might want to leave the kindergarteners at home for this one.

Allusions

This is a reference to Greek language and mythology. In Greek, "Psyche" literally means "soul." The Greeks turned her into a goddess, a personification of the human soul. That's what Poe is work...
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