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The Unbearable Lightness of Being

The Unbearable Lightness of Being

  

by Milan Kundera

The Unbearable Lightness of Being Part 6, Chapter 3 Summary

  • When the narrator was little, he used to look at the image of God in an illustrated Bible. God looked like a man, and had a mouth.
  • But the narrator used to worry that, if God had a mouth, he must eat, and if he eats, he must defecate. This sacrilege worried him greatly.
  • He points out that Gnostics in the second century thought the same way, and posited that God ate, but did not defecate.

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