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Upon Julia's Clothes

Upon Julia's Clothes

  

by Robert Herrick

Upon Julia's Clothes Theme of Awe and Amazement

The Speaker of "Upon Julia's Clothes" is stunned by the beauty of Julia's clothes, or at least by his perception of that beauty. He describes her clothes with phrases that strongly suggest some type of amazement or sense of awe about Julia and her awesome outfit. Indeed, by the end of the poem he is taken; he's quite literally in awe of all that glitter.

Questions About Awe and Amazement

  1. What's the speaker really in awe of—Julia herself, or her fashion sense?
  2. How does the language of the poem convey awe? What words specifically do the trick?
  3. Is the speaker feeling awe and amazement in that last line? Or something else? 

Chew on This

Try on an opinion or two, start a debate, or play the devil’s advocate.

This guy is not in awe of Julia at all, just the illusion she manages to create with her beautiful clothing.

At the end of the poem, the speaker is not in awe of Julia, but rather of her ability to make him swoon.

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