* Site-Outage Notice: Our engineering elves will be tweaking the Shmoop site from Monday, December 22 10:00 PM PST to Tuesday, December 23 5:00 AM PST. The site will be unavailable during this time.
Dismiss
© 2014 Shmoop University, Inc. All rights reserved.
Utopia

Utopia

by Thomas More

Utopia Analysis

Literary Devices in Utopia

Symbolism, Imagery, Allegory

Setting

Buckle your seatbelts, Shmoopers, because the setting in Utopia is a whole web of goodness. One level of setting is where the action of the primary narration takes place; in other words, the stuff...

Narrator Point of View

Our author, Thomas More, is also our first person narrator. Yep. How's that for confusing?This wasn't all that uncommon at the time. In fact, since discovery of the new world was an actual historic...

Genre

Utopia essentially invented a new genre: Utopian, or Dystopian, Literature. Have an inkling of what that might mean? It's when you use elements of fantasy and science-fiction to describe a place th...

Tone

Let's be honest. Utopia is not filled with dramatic emotion, but that doesn't mean our faithful narrator Thomas More doesn't care deeply about what he's hearing, or for that matter, that Hythloday...

Writing Style

Fun and GamesPlayful? Utopia? Yes, really. Just because some of the issues at hand are serious, doesn't mean More isn't having fun with this whole invent-your-own world thing. You know all those fu...

What's Up With the Title?

It's kind of big deal, actually. Such a big deal, that an entire genre is based on its title: Utopia. Utopia is a name More invented by combining the ancient Greek adverb "not" (ou) with the Greek...

What's Up With the Ending?

The ending of Utopia is famously ambiguous, and also, a bit anti-climactic. So don't worry if you finished the book with a bit of a huh? For centuries, people have found the ending frustrating beca...

Tough-o-Meter

Utopia may sound like your average travel fantasy, but it's actually about some pretty deep stuff. The text investigates some heavy-hitting questions of political philosophy, some of which are very...

Plot Analysis

Traveler meets TravelerWhile traveling in Europe, Thomas More meets his old friend Peter Giles and makes a new friend, Raphael Hythloday. Since they all love chatting and sharing their experience,...

Booker's Seven Basic Plots Analysis

Raphael Hythloday is a smart, smart guy, but he's bored with the regular old day-to-day and disenchanted with the political corruption and economic inequality of Europe. Luckily for him, there's lo...

Three-Act Plot Analysis

Thomas More, Peter Giles, and Raphael Hythloday meet up and decide to have a philosophical chat. Sitting in Peter Giles' garden, they debate how effective philosophy can be in changing political po...

Trivia

When More wrote his first draft of Utopia, he sent a copy to his pal (and big-deal Renaissance thinker) Erasmus, who made a bunch of little, marginal notes for himself. When he returned the text to...

Steaminess Rating

While "sexy" is probably not the first word that comes to mind when thinking of Utopia, there are some strange marriage practices and rules for sexual conduct that Hythloday spends some time discus...

Allusions

Virgil, Aeneid (1.10; 1.12)Homer, Odyssey (1.10; 1.12)Plato (1.10)Seneca (1.10)Cicero (1.10)Sallust (1.18)Plato, Republic (1.28, 36, 38)Gospel of Luke, New Testament (1.27)Many Old Testament Refere...

People who Shmooped this also Shmooped...

Advertisement
Noodle's College Search
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement