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Analysis

Sometimes, there’s more to Lit than meets the eye.

Catherine's New Look

In the first scene of the play, we get a symbolic conflict over Catherine's burgeoning sexuality. She has recently given herself a bit of a makeover. We don't get before-and-after shots like on all...

Eddie's Cigar vs. Rodolpho's Coffee

Let's take a look at the symbolic final images Miller gives us at end of the first two scenes. Scene one: Catherine lights Eddie's cigar. Scene two: Catherine pours sugar into Rodolpho's coffee. Ra...

"Paper Doll"

When Rodolpho decides to show off his lovely tenor voice to his new benefactors, he makes the incredibly symbolic choice of singing "Paper Doll." It would seem that the symbolism isn't lost on Eddi...

Homosexuality

This section should probably be labeled "supposed" homosexuality. Miller never tells us if Rodolfo is gay or not. Eddie, however, is sure of it. To our disgruntled longshoreman, several different t...

The Double Kiss

One of the most talked about moments in A View from the Bridge is the double kiss. Eddie comes home drunk and finds Catherine and Rodolpho fresh from a make-out session. His response is to get all...

The Lifting of the Chair

Now it's Marco's turn for a symbolic act of male dominance. At the end of Act I he challenges Eddie to lift a chair by one its legs with only one of his arms. Eddie can't do it. Marco easily hoists...

Brooklyn Bridge

One theory is that the bridge symbolizes hope for a better life. It's the bridge from poor Brooklyn to rich Manhattan. Eddie claims to dream of his beloved niece going to Manhattan and associating...

Eddie's Death

The play ends with Eddie being stabbed with his own knife and dying. On top of that, Marco twists Eddie's arm around weirdly, such that its Eddie's own hand that drives the blade home. Does this ha...
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