© 2014 Shmoop University, Inc. All rights reserved.
The Voyage of the Dawn Treader

The Voyage of the Dawn Treader

by C.S. Lewis

The Voyage of the Dawn Treader Analysis

Literary Devices in The Voyage of the Dawn Treader

Symbolism, Imagery, Allegory

It would be almost impossible for us to list every single Biblical allusion in this book. As a devoted theologian, C.S. Lewis was well-versed in Christian symbolism, and even his simplest books are...

Setting

First of all, let's clarify what we mean by "Narnia." Technically, Narnia is a country – the nation ruled by King Caspian. In the world where Narnia exists there are also other countries, such...

Narrator Point of View

The narration of The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, like that of The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, is a curious mixture of a third-person omniscient feel with a first-person narrator occasionally...

Genre

The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, like the other Chronicles of Narnia, is considered classic children's literature. It uses a straightforward vocabulary and syntax geared toward the child reader and...

Tone

At first glance these two labels might seem to be contradictory: how can the tone of a book be both playful and solemn? Aren't those opposites? Well, yeah, but The Voyage of the Dawn Treader is de...

Writing Style

Like the other Narnia chronicles, The Voyage of the Dawn Treader is written in a straightforward, easy-to-understand, conversational style – as long as you're thinking of having that conversation...

What's Up With the Title?

The title of this particular Narnia chronicle clues us in to the fact that it has an episodic plot and several main characters. Instead of titling the book with the hero's name (such as the previo...

What's Up With the Ending?

The Voyage of the Dawn Treader ends with everyone going their separate ways. Caspian returns to Narnia, taking Ramandu's daughter with him as his new Queen. Reepicheep fulfills his destiny and tr...

Tough-o-Meter

We think it's appropriate that this maritime adventure has a difficulty of "sea level." The prose isn't difficult, and the plot is so exciting that it moves along quickly. For most readers, it wi...

Plot Analysis

King Caspian sets out in his ship the Dawn Treader to seek the seven missing lords of Narnia. He is joined by King Edmund, Queen Lucy, and their horrible cousin Eustace.This is how it all starts:...

Booker's Seven Basic Plots Analysis

Edmund, Lucy, and Eustace are pulled from their own world through a magical painting into the eastern seas of the world of Narnia.The call of the heroes in this book is difficult to miss: our three...

Three-Act Plot Analysis

Eustace Scrubb is magically transported to Narnia along with his cousins Edmund and Lucy Pevensie. Eustace meets King Caspian and joins the voyage of his ship the Dawn Treader, but remains critica...

Trivia

Some people speculate that C.S. Lewis's description of Eustace's parents in Chapter 1 parodies Mormons or Seventh Day Adventists. However, Lewis's adopted son, Douglas Gresham, said that the resem...

People who Shmooped this also Shmooped...

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement