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Themes

Growing up is hard no matter what and figuring out who you are is part of the struggle. Even when you're supposed to be a grown-up, it's hard to feel totally comfortable with your identity. And it's doubly tough when you lose someone you love. Our gal Sal gets to learn all these tough lessons in <em>Walk Two Moons. </em>We watch Chanhassen Hiddle and Mrs. Winterbottom struggle to figure out who they are. We watch Sal learn how to be in the world without her mom. These struggles are hard, messy, and painful but also full of hopeful surprises. Eventually, Sal discovers that it's okay to be on her own, away from her mother. In fact, it might help her find herself and grow into the person she's meant to be.

Questions About Identity

  1. In Chapter 6, Sal is full of memories. She remembers a moment when her mom said, "See? I'm almost as good as your father!" She remembers feeling betrayed when her mother said this. Why do you think Sal felt betrayed by this? Would you feel betrayed, too, if you were in Sal's shoes? (6.32)
  2. What do you think Sal's mom means when she says, "'I'll never be a true Hiddle?'" (3.25)
  3. One night, Sal realizes that she can be happy without her mother. When she realizes this, she says, "it seemed a mean thought and I was sorry for it, but it felt true." Why does this thought seem mean? Is it mean? (7.14)
  4. What does it mean to know someone? Does Sal know her mother well? Do Gram and Gramps know each other well? Who knows someone really well in this book?

Chew on This

Try on an opinion or two, start a debate, or play the devil’s advocate.

Sal learns that growing up means figuring out how you really feel and not how you are supposed to feel.

Sal's mom struggles with her own identity because of her role as a wife and mom.

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