© 2014 Shmoop University, Inc. All rights reserved.
 
Teaching Guide

Teaching the War of 1812

Spoiler alert: it happened in 1812.

GO TO STUDENT LEARNING GUIDE

When teaching history, it's easy to skip straight from 1811 to 1813. But there's a whole year in there and a whole war—albeit an uncreatively named one (and one that actually lasted until 1815). So before you skip over The War of 1812, let us help you teach it.

In this guide you will find

  • lessons that analyze historical documents and iconic images.
  • essay questions that dig deeper than "In what year did the War of 1812 begin?"
  • resources illustrating the long-lasting implications of the war, from the phrase caveat emptor to Dolley Madison's contributions (which didn't involve baked goods).

With our guide, teaching the War of 1812 doesn't have to be a losing experience.

What's Inside Shmoop's History Teaching Guides

Shmoop is a labor of love from folks who love to teach. Our teaching guides will help you supplement in-classroom learning with fun, engaging, and relatable learning materials that bring history to life.

Inside each guide you'll find quizzes, activity ideas, discussion questions, and more—all written by experts and designed to save you time. Here are the deets on what you get with your teaching guide:

  • 3-5 Common Core-aligned activities (including quotation, image, and document analysis) to complete in class with your students, with detailed instructions for you and your students. 
  • Discussion and essay questions for all levels of students.
  • Reading quizzes to be sure students are looking at the material through various lenses.
  • Resources to help make the topic feel more relevant to your 21st-century students.
  • A note from Shmoop's teachers to you, telling you what to expect from teaching the topic and how you can overcome the hurdles.

With your purchase, you'll get unlimited access for 12 months. And if you like what you see, you can subscribe to all 200+ Teaching Guides for just $19.84/month.

Instructions for You

In this writing exercise your students will clarify their interpretation of the war's meaning by selecting and addressing one of the following quotes.

"The War of 1812 was a waste of resources and human lives. It was entered into rashly and poorly fought. The treaty that brought the war to an end resolved nothing." 
— Some historian, 20

"The war has renewed and reinstated the national feelings and character which the Revolution had given, and which were daily lessened. The people . . . . are more American; they feel and act more as a nation; and I hope the permanency of the Union is thereby better secured."
— Secretary of the Treasury Albert Gallatin, 1816

Instructions for Your Students

What did the War of 1812 accomplish? Did it serve any purpose or leave any legacy? Address one of the following two quotations in an essay.

"The War of 1812 was a waste of resources and human lives. It was entered into rashly and poorly fought. The treaty that brought the war to an end resolved nothing." 
— Some historian, 2010

"The war has renewed and reinstated the national feelings and character which the Revolution had given, and which were daily lessened. The people . . . . are more American; they feel and act more as a nation; and I hope the permanency of the Union is thereby better secured."
— Secretary of the Treasury Albert Gallatin, 1816

Already have a license?
CLICK HERE to sign in!

OPTIONS FOR PURCHASE

I am buying...
I am buying...
For teacher(s).
Price: $14.92
Good things come
in affordable packages.
GET A QUOTE FOR YOUR
SCHOOL OR DISTRICT
Teachers, want access to all courses for your own use at a low monthly rate?
Subscribe for only as long as you need.
Share


WANT MORE HELP TEACHING THE WAR OF 1812?

Check out all the different parts of our corresponding learning guide.

Intro    Summary & Analysis    Timeline    People    Facts    Photos    Best of the Web    Citations    Test Review    
back to top