From 11:00PM PDT on Friday, July 1 until 5:00AM PDT on Saturday, July 2, the Shmoop engineering elves will be making tweaks and improvements to the site. That means Shmoop will be unavailable for use during that time. Thanks for your patience!
We have changed our privacy policy. In addition, we use cookies on our website for various purposes. By continuing on our website, you consent to our use of cookies. You can learn about our practices by reading our privacy policy.
© 2016 Shmoop University, Inc. All rights reserved.
Warm Bodies

Warm Bodies

  

by Isaac Marion

Warm Bodies Theme of Literature and Writing

The Epic of Gilgamesh was written around 2500 BCE. That makes it the oldest book on Earth. Older than the Bible. And people are still talking about it. Warm Bodies even uses it as its epigraph (which you can read more about in our "What's Up With the Epigraph?" section). This alone shows the crazy longevity of the written word. The characters in that book—in any book—stay alive long after its author has moved on. Like everything in Warm Bodies, the ultimate result is life. Life is like one big system that's bigger than just people, and reading and writing is a crucial artery to keeping lifeblood flowing.

Questions About Literature and Writing

  1. How does R's life start to change when he remembers how to read?
  2. How is Living society affected by its growing illiteracy?
  3. Why is writing so important to Perry? Why does he stop writing?
  4. What themes do The Epic of Gilgamesh and Warm Bodies share?

People who Shmooped this also Shmooped...

Advertisement