From 11:00PM PDT on Friday, July 1 until 5:00AM PDT on Saturday, July 2, the Shmoop engineering elves will be making tweaks and improvements to the site. That means Shmoop will be unavailable for use during that time. Thanks for your patience!
We have changed our privacy policy. In addition, we use cookies on our website for various purposes. By continuing on our website, you consent to our use of cookies. You can learn about our practices by reading our privacy policy.
© 2016 Shmoop University, Inc. All rights reserved.
Watership Down

Watership Down

  

by Richard Adams

Companion

Character Role Analysis

Companion: Dandelion, Blackberry, Pipkin, Bluebell, and Blackavar

As we've said before, Watership Down is kind of like a heist film where a group of people come together to pull off a big crime, and all of those people are necessary team members because each has their own skill. (If you prefer, let's call this the bunny A-Team.) Each of these rabbits has their own gift to bring to the group. So each of these rabbits helps Hazel's warren survive.

Dandelion tells stories, Blackberry invents, Pipkin … well, idolizes Hazel (which isn't actually all that useful, but it's something), Bluebell jokes and keeps spirits up (and also tells stories), and Blackavar, well, his skill is really his love of freedom and the example he sets by going through terrible pain to achieve that freedom.

Romantic Interest: The Does

Clover, Hyzenthlay, Vilthuril and the other does are the romantic interest in the book, though as we argue elsewhere, they do a lot of work as symbols (rather than as characters). There aren't a ton of feelings here—only an urge to breed more bunnies.


Advertisement