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The Watsons Go to Birmingham—1963

The Watsons Go to Birmingham—1963

by Christopher Paul Curtis

The Watsons Go to Birmingham—1963 Themes

Little Words, Big Ideas

Coming of Age

You know how when you're a kid, some things that are real seem sort of imaginary (like death or war) and some things that are imaginary seem like they could be real (like monsters or magic)? The pr...

Family

Like it or not, the Watsons are in this together. They're a family first, and they tackle the world as unit. They love each other, hate each other, irritate each other, and try to understand each o...

Friendship

Friends are tough, huh? They can be good influences (like Rufus) or bad influences (like Buphead), but either way, who we choose as friends and how we treat them has a lot to do with the kind of pe...

Society and Class

When we think of class, we usually think of economic class—you know, who's got the Benjamins and who doesn't. And sure, that kind of class plays a role in The Watsons Go to Birmingham—1963. Aft...

Race

The Watsons Go to Birmingham—1963 takes place right smack dab in the middle of the Civil Rights Movement, so you know people are going to being thinking a lot about race. Here's what was going do...

Mortality

Lessons about mortality c/o The Watsons Go to Birmingham—1963:• We can't live forever. • The people we love won't live forever.• Death can strike anywhere at any time. • Sometimes death i...

Foolishness and Folly

Let's face it—Byron is a fool for most of The Watsons Go to Birmingham—1963. He seems to make the dumbest decision possible every chance he gets, which means he's trouble all the time. But it's...

Guilt and Blame

Guilt is pretty much one of the worst feelings, and our main squeeze really struggles with it. Some of the guilt he experiences is legitimate (like when he hurts Rufus's feelings) but some is self-...

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