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When You Reach Me

When You Reach Me

by Rebecca Stead

Friendship Quotes

How we cite our quotes:

Quote #1

She met Louisa, who didn't have a husband either, in the lobby on that first day. They were both taking garbage to the big cans out front. Louisa was holding Sal. Sal had been crying, but when he saw me, he stopped.

I know all this because I used to ask to hear the story over and over: the story of the day I met Sal. (4.26-27)

Miranda introduces one of main plot points: the story of her friendship with Sal. We know that the two were friends for a very long time, since they were very small. The question now, though, is where is that friendship going?

Quote #2

I used to think of Sal as being a part of me: Sal and Miranda, Miranda and Sal. I knew he wasn't really, but that's the way it felt. (5.9)

The way Miranda sees herself is really connected to Sal. She sees him not as a different person, but as part of her. Is this a good or a bad thing? What does the book suggest?

Quote #3

One time, when Sal had a fever and Louisa had called in sick to her job and kept him home, the daycare lady handed me my carpet square at nap time, and then, a second later, she gave me Sal's, too.

"I know how it is, baby," she said.

And then I lay on her floor not sleeping because Sal wasn't there to press his foot against mine. (5.11-13)

In this story from her nursery school days, Miranda tells us how she couldn't take a nap without Sal there to touch his foot with hers. Does Miranda still feel this way about Sal? Is it a sign of a strong friendship or a troubled one?

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