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Quotes

Quote #4

"I had thought you might join your sister in her seat of authority," he said, with the simple-minded hope of one whose family has been too long apart. "I know who you are, Fabala, I doubt you have much changed over the years." (4.3.4.26)

The idea that your family "knows" you best is really tried and tested in this book. Nessa and Frex often seem to peg Elphaba perfectly, but they also sometimes miss the mark with her. Frex's use of the nickname "Fabala" helps demonstrate this; he's referring to a part of Elphaba that might not really exist anymore. How do Elphaba's other name changes over the book show her identity shifts?

Quote #5

She sat down, wary, tired, astonished at the wealth of her own feeling for [her father]. She was full of need. But, she reminded herself, you're a grown woman. (4.3.4.11)

It's interesting that Elphaba would think that she shouldn't "need" her father now that she's an adult. There's this idea that grown-ups should be independent, but Wicked demonstrates that the reverse may be true: family might become more important with age.

Quote #6

And Elphaba saw that by not knowing for sure if Nessarose had been fathered by himself or by Turtle Heart, Frex had decided in some subrational way that she was the daughter of them both.... It didn't matter how crippled Nessarose was; she would always be more than Elphaba, always. She would always mean more. (4.3.6.34)

This is probably the ultimate summation of Elphaba's relationship with both her father and sister. The word choice here is really great. Nessa "means" more, and this quest for meaning in life and in herself is a huge part of Elphaba's character. We also learn about Frex's feelings for Turtle Heart here, and the bizarre love triangle that existed between him, Turtle Heart, and Melena.

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