Die Heuning Pot Literature Guide
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Quotes

Quote #13

"Listen to me, sister," she said. "Remember this: Nothing is written in the stars. Not these stars, nor any other. No one controls your destiny." (4.1.3.43)

OK, we're back on board with Princess Nastoya now, because this is pretty straightforward. These also sound like song lyrics. The "any other" star reference is definitely intriguing, though. Is Nastoya aware that Elphaba is half from the Other World?

Quote #14

For who was in thrall to whom, really? And could it ever be known? Each agent working in collusion and antagonism – like the cold and the sun alike creating a deadly spear of ice. (4.3.7.4)

"In thrall" basically means under someone's control. "Thrall" is an interesting word choice here, since it implies a sort of spell. A person can be enthralled (mesmerized or obsessed) by someone or something. The last part of the sentence is the start of a really interesting style shift in the book. We hear about Manek's death rather abruptly, then sort of travel backward through Elphaba's thoughts, with poetic references to the sun and the ice, and Sarima's hot and cold types of anger, until we reach the moment when Elphaba loosed the ice spear and killed Manek.

Quote #15

"Act Three," he said. "The Marriage of the Sacred and the Wicked."

She waited, but no area was illuminated, no puppet moved.

"Well?" she said.

"Well what?" he answered.

"Where's the end of the play?"

He stuck his head out of a trap door and winked at her. "Who said the end was written yet?" he answered. (5.8.39-44)

This play was a total rip-off. But the dwarf was apparently channeling Princess Nastoya, since he has the same "written in the stars" idea of destiny. The differences in tone between Nastoya's destiny talk and the dwarf's are notable.

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