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Quotes

Quote #1

“You are not a Puritan then?”

“Puritan? You mean a Roundhead? One of those traitors who murdered King Charles?”

A spark of protest flashed across his mild gray eyes. He started to speak, then thought better of it, and asked gently, “You are going to stay here in Connecticut?” (1.67-69)

One of the major dividers between Kit and the people of Connecticut is religion. Kit and her family are loyal to England and to the Church of England. The Wood family, meanwhile, are Puritans, which means that they want to reform the Church of England. They are also critical of England and its role in the colonies.

Quote #2

“Why, Judith,” Mercy rebuked her gently. “What would you have her do? You know what the Scriptures tell us about caring for the poor and widows.” (4.3)

As her name suggests, Mercy is the heart and soul of the Wood household. She does not get caught up in petty prejudices or politics, but instead understands religion as kindness and giving. Here she suggests that the Scriptures ask followers to act as good neighbors. She is the moral center of the Wood family.

Quote #3

“Do people live in those tiny houses?” she inquired.

“Of course not. Those are Sabbath houses.” Then Judith emerged from her own musings long enough to explain. “Families that live too far to go home between services cook their meal there on Sunday, and in the winter they can warm themselves at a fire.” (5.42-43)

In this scene Kit and Judith pass the small structures known as Sabbath houses. Kit, much to her astonishment, realizes that she’ll be attending two very long religious services that Sunday. Kit mentions earlier in the chapter that she and her grandfather rarely attended church (5.4). Note the level of devotion implied by the little houses.

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