© 2014 Shmoop University, Inc. All rights reserved.
World War Z

World War Z

by Max Brooks

Change Theme

In World War Z, change generally comes in two flavors: tasty change, nasty change, and the occasional swirled combination of both. But the novel's consideration of change goes beyond labeling one type of change bad and another good. The real concern here is how people respond to change. Israel understands change is inevitable and keeps an eye out for it, preparing the best they can. As a result, they weather the zombie apocalypse better than others. Countries like Russia and America want to maintain the status quo, trying to fix the problem while also keep it hidden. This response makes an already nasty change worse. So, while change can be either positive or negative, the degree relies largely on the way we respond to it.

Questions About Change

  1. What has changed from the time before and after the zombie wars? What hasn't changed? Do you recognize any patterns?
  2. What character goes through the most change in the novel? Describe the change. Why do you think it's the most and why is it important?
  3. Is there any part of the world or human existence the zombies have not changed? If yes, what is it? It not, then why not?

Chew on This

Try on an opinion or two, start a debate, or play the devil’s advocate.

World War Z seems to suggest that our modern lifestyle makes dealing with change more difficult.

In World War Z, anything that brings about a negative change can also bring about a positive change, zombies included.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement