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Wuthering Heights

Wuthering Heights

  

by Emily Brontë

Wuthering Heights The Supernatural Quotes

How we cite our quotes: (Chapter.Paragraph)

Quote #1

[. . .] knocking my knuckles through the glass, and stretching an arm out to seize the importunate branch: instead of which, my fingers closed on the fingers of a little, ice-cold hand. The intense horror of nightmare came over me: I tried to draw back my arm, but the hand clung to it, and a most melancholy voice sobbed, "Let me in—let me in!" (3.45)

Lockwood discovers his first night at Wuthering Heights that all is not normal there. But one central question is, is the ghost real or a figment of Lockwood's imagination?

Quote #2

I suppose that she wanted to get another proof that the place was haunted, at my expense. Well, it is—swarming with ghosts and goblins! You have reason in shutting it up, I assure you. No one will thank you for a doze in such a den! (3.67)

Once again, Lockwood reveals his gross inability to accurately assess a situation. The ghost he has just encountered is much more than a creepy creature, and Heathcliff envies him for having touched Catherine's icy hand. As usual, Lockwood is unable to see the situation outside of how it affects him.

Quote #3

I obeyed, so far as to quit the chamber; when, ignorant where the narrow lobbies led, I stood still, and was witness, involuntarily, to a piece of superstition on the part of my landlord which belied, oddly, his apparent sense. (3.81)

Heathcliff cannot hide his anguish even from his new tenant. This moment is one of the few in which Heathcliff expresses sorrow without rage.

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