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World War II: Home Front

World War II: Home Front

 Table of Contents

World War II: Home Front Terms

Allied Powers

In World War II, the Allied powers were those countries, including Great Britain, the Soviet Union, the United States, China, and France (before its defeat in 1940), that opposed the Axis powers.

In World War II, the Allied powers were those countries, including Great Britain, the Soviet Union, the United States, China, and France (before its defeat in 1940), that opposed the Axis powers.

Axis Powers, Axis

In World War II, the alliance of Germany, Italy, and Japan formed the Axis powers.

In World War II, the alliance of Germany, Italy, and Japan formed the Axis powers.

Concentration Camp

A prison within which people who allegedly pose some sort of threat to the state—political, intellectual, religious, economic, or military—are detained so that they can be monitored and prevented from communicating with others outside the camp. Since the Nazi Holocaust, the term has been associated with a specific type of place in which people are deprived of food, forced to work, tortured, and killed.

Dishonorable Discharge

The release of a military serviceman from all duties—usually for a crime—without recognition of his or her accomplishments or sacrifices.

"Double V"

Black leaders during the Second World War adopted this phrase to describe the specific type of battle African Americans would have to fight, a battle on two fronts—for "victory over our enemies at home and victory over our enemies on the battlefields abroad."

Black leaders during the Second World War adopted this phrase to describe the specific type of battle African-Americans would have to fight, a battle on two fronts—for "victory over our enemies at home and victory over our enemies on the battlefields abroad."

Internment

The confinement or imprisonment of people without trial, especially during a war. Often those detained in internment camps pose some sort of threat to the state—political, intellectual, religious, economic, or military—and are confined in one place so that they can be monitored and prevented from communicating with others outside the camp.

Jim Crow

Jim Crow laws restricted blacks from entering many public and private facilities designated for whites, including parks, libraries, schools, restaurants, bathrooms, markets, bars, pools, and even brothels. After the 1870s, Jim Crow restrictions were most prevalent in the South, where nearly 90% of the nation's black population lived. However, before the American Civil War, Jim Crow laws had existed outside the South in cities such as Boston, New York, and Philadelphia.

The term "Jim Crow" was first coined in the 1830s by American audiences who watched Thomas "Daddy" Rice, a white man performing in blackface, portray a comic black slave who danced and sang with glee. By the early 1900s, the term had come to describe the institutionalized system of segregation that kept blacks and whites separate in schools, restaurants, theaters, bathrooms, pools, buses, bars, markets, libraries and all other public facilities in the American South.

The term "Jim Crow" was first coined in the 1830s by American audiences who watched Thomas "Daddy" Rice, a white man performing in black face, portray a comic black slave who danced and sang with glee. By the early 1900s, the term had come to describe the institutionalized system of segregation that kept blacks and whites separate in schools, restaurants, theaters, bathrooms, pools, buses, bars, markets, libraries and all other public facilities in the American South.

A minstrel-show character first introduced by white actor Thomas "Daddy" Rice in the 1830s. The name of this buffoonish, black caricature became synonymous with racial segregation in the post-Civil War era.

The term "Jim Crow" was first coined in the 1830s by American audiences who watched Thomas "Daddy" Rice, a white man performing in blackface, portray a comic black slave who danced and sang with glee. By the early 1900s, the term had come to describe the institutionalized system of segregation that kept blacks and whites separate in schools, restaurants, theaters, bathrooms, pools, buses, bars, markets, libraries and all other public facilities in the American South.

Lend-lease, Lend-Lease Act Of 1941

The Lend-Lease Act of 1941 permitted the United States to lend or lease weapons, military vessels, and other supplies to the Allies. The act seemed to contradict President Franklin Roosevelt's promise of American neutrality and hinted at the likelihood of U.S. involvement in World War II.

Munitions

This is another term for ammunition, but in the case of war mobilization it refers not to bullets and gunpowder but to bombs, missiles, and mines.

New Deal

A set of experimental government programs and reforms instituted by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in the 1930s. The New Deal, through federal spending, price regulations, job placement, the expansion of unions, greater access to home loans, and social security for the elderly and disabled, was meant to bring relief to a population reeling from the Great Depression. It did transform the nation in some significant ways but did not succeed in ending the Great Depression.

A set of experimental government programs and reforms instituted by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in the 1930s. The New Deal, through federal spending, price regulations, job placement, the expansion of unions, greater access to home loans, and social security for the elderly and disabled, was meant to bring relief to a population reeling from the Great Depression. It did transform the nation in some significant ways but did not succeed in ending the Great Depression.

A set of government programs adopted during the Great Depression under the leadership of President Franklin Roosevelt. Premised on the belief that economic conditions demanded far more aggressive government action, the New Deal moved the government beyond regulation and oversight into the role of job creator and income insurer. The government provided direct relief to the needy under the Federal Emergency Relief Act. It created jobs for the unemployed under the Public Works Administration, Works Progress Administration, and Civilian Conservation Corps. Agricultural prices were manipulated through the Agricultural Adjustment Act. Workers rights to organize into unions were protected under the Wagner Act. Through the Tennessee Valley Authority, the federal government set about re-constructing the economy of an entire region. And through the creation of Social Security, Congress created a federal pension plan for seniors.

Third Reich

Germany from 1933 to 1945 was governed by the National Socialist German Workers Party, or the Nazi Party, and is referred to as the Third Reich.

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