3rd Grade Math Teacher Course

Someone has to build the Mathemagic Kingdom

Humans are not like most species: We start life playing and we never stop. Most species stop playing as adults to focus on surviving. We don't. We play with others. We play alone. We play to stop boredom and continue having fun. We play a lot. We play so much that as communities we actively rope off sections of our cities and towns, call them parks, and set up a ton of games for kids of all ages there. But parks don't just grow on trees, they require park engineers, or third grade math students.

Park engineers are lovely people—we are certain of this—but you can't send an adult to a kid's fight. 

In this course, we ask students to design a park. As park engineers students will dream up new and thrilling ways to play and design the perfect space for them: their ideal park. Math will be required, of course, and that's where we come in.

In each unit of this math course, we challenge students to design one aspect of their ideal park. While dreaming up and designing their ideal park in Common Core-based lessons, students will work on fractions, polish their multiplication skills, and solve real-world problems involving the four operations. Students will use measurement skills to compute areas and perimeters of their wonderland. They'll work within a budget to landscape the park and hire workers, estimating daily rates and total costs. They'll even design artwork for the park using geometric shapes, their park adventure finally culminating in an epic grand opening party.

The only thing this course doesn't mention is the possibility of trolls living underneath the park, but who doesn't enjoy surprises? 

What's in Shmoop's Math Elementary Curriculum?

These are year-long project based elementary courses with 90-day-long semesters, made up of themed, Common Core-aligned units. You can follow the course verbatim in its day-by-day progression, or cherry-pick specific lessons by previewing the curriculum maps and seeing which standards, skills, or texts you'd most like to teach. Courses also include teacher scripts, differentiation and extension activities, videos, worksheets, and answer keys.