Study Guide

Hope Was Here Principles

By Joan Bauer

Principles

G.T. expresses the principal principle of Hope Was Here with these four words: "Do the right thing." He credits the cancer for teaching him this valuable life-lesson, but his strong moral compass was set in the right direction long before his diagnosis. He sets out to prove that it's not the amount of time one has to do the right thing, but doing what's right in the amount of time one has. Millstone has had eight years to do the right thing, but hasn't exactly made the best use of his time. G.T.'s commitment to his principles is so strong that he inspires the people around him to live by them, too.

Hope learns a lot from G.T., just like she's learned a lot from Addie. Keep going, always look forward, never give up—pretty good principles to live by. After all, her name is Hope.

Questions About Principles

  1. Is Cranston Broom, owner of the Real Fresh Dairy, just as much to blame as Mayor Millstone for the corruption that plagues Mulhoney?
  2. Once Hope realizes that G.T. will kind of become her father once he marries Addie, she tells him (in one of her imaginary conversations) that she's "expecting [him] to do the right thing" (157). What's "the right thing" she's referring to?
  3. Do Sid Vole's own personal morals differ from the professional morals he encourages G.T. to adopt during the campaign?

Chew on This

The most important principle for the employees of the Real Fresh Dairy is to do the right thing, which means voting for G.T. and cleaning up the corruption.

The most important principle for the employees of the Real Fresh Dairy is to do the right thing, which means being able to keep their jobs and and put food on the table for their families.

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