Study Guide

Goldfinger Lust

Lust

We could basically copy and paste our introduction for the "Greed" theme right here, because isn't lust basically just greed for sex? As Goldfinger is set in the swingin' 1960s, you'll notice that lust is more of a virtue than a sin here, at least when it comes to the activities of James Bond. He's the good guy, but he is definitely a ladies' man.

The villain, on the other hand, is virtually sexless. Bond, in fact, learns that Goldfinger's two most beautiful female employees don't sleep with their boss, which makes sexual harassment one of the only crimes Goldfinger won't be accused of. For Bond, on the other hand, "lust" is practically in his job description as a perk of employment.

Questions About Lust

  1. Is there a double standard when it comes to lust in the Bond universe?
  2. Why does it matter to Bond whether or not the women have slept with Goldfinger?
  3. Why isn't Pussy Galore initially interested in Bond? What changes her mind? Is her "transformation" realistic?

Chew on This

Bond is a man who has the entire world at his fingertips. It's part of the fantasy. And with that fantasy comes the ability to have any woman he chooses.

Pussy Galore is an example of Bond's ability to, um, charm women. She's coded as a lesbian, but Bond is able to "change" her with his magic touch.

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