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FSA ELA Grades 9–10

Shmooping the Sunshine State, ELA style.

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If ever there were a land of adventure and news-worthy headlines, Florida is it. The sun! The oranges! The Wizarding World of Harry Potter! The FSA ELA exam! Okay, so that last one is less palm tree-oriented than we normally prefer, unless CPALMS count. It's got CPALMS out the wazoo.

We've got you covered, though. Dangling modifiers and author's rhetorical purpose don't stand a chance with Shmoop's wicked-good test prep in your back pocket—and neither does that lingering ball of lint fluff.

What's Inside Shmoop's Online FSA ELA Grades 9–10 Test Prep

We'd love it if Shmoop's FSA ELA prep included such prizes as candy bars, free naps, and scratch-n-sniff stickers. Alas, all of those were vetoed. We've got all this instead:

  • a diagnostic exam to help identify areas to work on and ones to brag about
  • two full-length exam per grade level with in-depth answer explanations
  • strategies for test-taking domination and stress reduction
  • topic reviews for every standard covered in the course and exam
  • absolute overkill on practice drills

Sample Content

Homonyms

Minus the exotic locales and snappy suits, a homonym is basically the grammar version of 007, living a double life. These words have multiple meanings, and often those meanings are completely unrelated. Check out this hypothetical conversation for examples.

"Has anyone seen my lucky teddy bear? I couldn't bear to lose him! I could have sworn I left him right over there. Let's take the train to go look for him. Maybe we should station somebody here to keep looking."

"Which way is the train station? Should we turn left or right at the intersection? Does anybody know how to train a dog to sniff out lost teddy bears?"

Bear, left, right, train, station: These are all homonyms, and there are tons of other examples out there. Unfortunately, there's no real way to study or memorize them all, so our best advice is to read as much as possible.

If a word pops up on the exam that seems out of place, consider that it might be a homonym and have a double meaning. Take a deep breath, use context clues to determine the real meaning, and go from there.