Study Guide

Bathsheba in 2 Samuel

Bathsheba

We don't really get much insight into Bathsheba's thought processes or psychology. We know that she's quite a looker, which causes David to fall for her and act incredibly wickedly in the aftermath of their tryst. But we really don't get a very solid sense of what her attitude towards David is on the whole, though she goes along with his seduction rather willingly, as far as the reader can tell.

In the narrative, Bathsheba exists more as a sounding board for David's desires. But we get to see that she still cares about her former husband, Uriah, weeping when he dies—indicating that she doesn't know that David planned to kill him. In fact, it's unclear if Bathsheba ever learns the truth about how Uriah actually died.

She also suffers because of David's actions, enduring the death of her child because of David's sin in killing her husband (though she did have a part in the adultery itself, as far as we know). But despite her status as a foreigner and a Hittite, it's she who gives birth to Solomon, David's successor, and a king who also (basically) retains God's love and favor.