Study Guide

And Then There Were None Chapter Four

By Agatha Christie

Chapter Four

  • Everyone brings up all the evidence they have of Mr. and Mrs. Owen, which consist of mostly their letters asking them to come to Soldier Island.
  • Of course everyone immediately refutes the claims that they caused anyone’s death at all. Because they’re uptight British people, they don’t curse so much as say things like, “It’s iniquitous! Wicked!”
  • Justice Wargrave starts off by saying that the man he’s accused of sentencing to death unfairly was definitely guilty.
  • Now it’s Vera’s turn: hers has to do with a child that she had acted as governess to. He drowned and she swam after him and tried to save him.
  • General Macarthur makes a similar excuse: his wife never cheated on him, so why on Earth would he send her lover to his death?
  • Philip Lombard, however, says that it’s true that he let the natives die. Everyone’s suitably appalled at this admission, as they are when Anthony Marston admits that he ran over a couple of people in his car.
  • But then the Rogers come in to say that they are not guilty of the crime they were accused of.
  • Gee, there are a whole lot of innocent people in this mansion.
  • Blore jumps on the innocent-train, saying that he didn’t do anything wrong, but he got a promotion from putting a guy in prison.
  • Of course, these people might not be so innocent after all. Dr. Armstrong straight-up denies that he knows the name Clees at all, while inside he’s thinking that he operated on someone while he was drunk and they happened to die.
  • Emily Brent refuses to say anything at all about what she did. She’s one hard nut to crack.
  • No one else is on the island, and they determine that there’s no boat to take them back to shore tonight, but they should definitely leave when it arrives in the morning.
  • Only Anthony Marston says that they should weed out the mystery—and takes a drink to it.
  • Of course, at that moment, he chokes on the drink and dies.