Study Guide

Burn Truth

By Julianna Baggott

Truth

Chapter 2

He's surprised by how loudly a secret can ring in your head. I killed him. It's not just a secret, though. He knows this. It's murder. (2.3)

Keeping a secret to yourself can make you anxious. Now imagine the secret being murder. Oh yeah, that'll make you go nuts.

Chapter 4

I killed him, Partridge wants to say. I killed him, and you should thank me for it. (4.14)

Yeah, sometimes keeping the truth hidden can be a good idea.

He'll force Hoppes' hand. One truth at a time […] until there's just one truth left—that he killed his father. He'll on to that one. (4.90)

Here's Partridge's main flaw; his plan is to expose the truth. But he doesn't expose the whole truth. If he wanted the truth to win out, he would have to own up to killing his father.

Chapter 6

Beckley doesn't say anything. He either doesn't know or doesn't want to tell Partridge the truth. (6.58)

You want the truth? You can't handle the truth!

"This is the way of the world. I saw the end, Partridge, and I was trying to save you from it." (6.157)

There are some many distortions of the truth in this trilogy, so imagine the loop Partridge is thrown into when his father tells him he needed to set off the Detonations. At this point, nothing is true for Partridge. He doesn't know what to believe.

"What I said is the truth. And I'm not taking it back. In fact, I'm going to lead us into the future with that truth." (6.24)

Partridge says this to a man who is threatening to jump in front of a moving train. And this is exactly what the man doesn't want to hear; the truth is what makes him suicidal.

"But we're Pure […] That's the truth. We are Pure. We deserve what we have." (6.25)

The Pures were fed lies their whole lives, so their idea of the truth is skewed. No one deserves to have everything just because.

Chapter 55

"You go around thinking that it's not fair that the wretches have to live out there. But I know that it's not fair that the Pures have to live in here—behind glass, battling around in our little fake world. If the Dome fell, it would be a mercy—not for the wretches, but the Pures." (55.8)

The Pures suffer just as much as the wretches—that's the truth. The Pures can't understand the wretches' suffering because they've dehumanized them, but the wretches can't understand the Pures' suffering because they've put them on a pedestal. The truth is hidden from both sides.

Chapter 64

"Bradwell was right. We should never erase the past, even when we wear it on our skin." (64.87)

The past is the truth; that's something most people can agree on. Bradwell really has a firm grasp on what's true and what's false in this trilogy.

"I do like it here." It's a half-truth. (64.9)

Eh, if something's a half-truth, maybe it's really not true at all. Points for effort aren't really points at all.