Study Guide

Code Name Verity Summary

By Elizabeth Wein

Code Name Verity Summary

Code Name Verity is the story of a friendship formed between two young women, Julie Beaufort-Stuart and Maddie Brodatt, during the early years of World War II. When the story opens, it's November 1943, and Julie is a prisoner of the Nazi Gestapo in Ormaie, a city in Nazi-occupied France.

Believing Maddie to be dead and having decided to exchange information in return for more time to write her story, Julie begins a long, detailed confession of everything she knows. However, Julie buries any information that would be of military use to the Nazis inside the story of her friendship with Maddie and how Maddie came to be the pilot who dropped Julie in France before crashing her damaged plane. Part 1 ends with an order from a high-ranking Nazi for Julie's execution.

Maddie takes up the narrative in Part 2, and she has lots of surprises for us, the first of which is that she's not dead—she did crash the plane after Julie parachuted out, but she survived. Stuck in France without appropriate identity papers, though, Maddie is in serious trouble. Oh—and she wasn't supposed to be flying into France in the first place. Oops.

Fortunately, she falls in with a Resistance circuit known as "Damask," the circuit Julie would have worked with had she not been captured early in her mission. The people of Damask help Maddie hide in plain sight by providing her with a false identity, and as she waits for a British refugee flight to get her out of France, she starts working with the group to find Julie and complete Julie's mission. Meanwhile, she writes Part 2 in her pilot's notebook in order to record details of the crash.

Maddie discovers that Julie will be transported, along with other prisoners, so Damask sets up an ambush to free them. The ambush goes terribly wrong, though, and unable to free her friend, Maddie shoots and kills Julie herself before the Nazis can begin torturing her.

One of Julie's interrogators turns and works with the Resistance—yay—and she delivers Julie's papers to Maddie. Maddie works out the information Julie embedded in them and uses it to help the members of Damask complete Julie's mission, which was to blow up the Ormaie Gestapo headquarters. She also discovers that Julie's "confession" is total lies, except for the parts about their friendship, and that Julie never told the Nazis anything of value. Part 2 ends with a letter from Julie's mother, telling Maddie she did the right thing and asking her to be like the daughter she lost.

  • Part 1, Chapter 1

    Ormaie 8.XI.43 JB-S

    Heads up, Shmoopsters: Most of this narrative doesn't occur in linear time. So fasten your seatbelts, and get ready to bounce back and forth between the present and the past.

    • In the first chapter, or the first dated entry in the narrator's confession, we learn that the narrator is a British spy who has been captured by the Nazis in occupied France. (It's called "occupied France" because the Nazis are occupying it, quite against everyone else's will.)
    • We know from the narrator's heading, "Ormaie 8.XI.43 JB-S," that she's in the French city of Ormaie and she's writing on November (XI), 8 (8), 1943 (43). We'll leave the letters alone for now because, well, we don't yet know what they stand for.
    • The first thing the narrator does is confess that she is a coward and has given up eleven sets of wireless code in exchange for getting her clothes back from the Nazi officer who has been interrogating her. She's writing this confession because it's clearly the easiest way out, and she's supposed to be giving her captors information pertinent to the British War Effort.
    • (Quick historical note: undercover radio operators worked throughout Nazi-occupied Europe to get information to the Allies, who were based in Great Britain, which still hadn't been occupied by the Nazis. They had to take on false identities and be really good with language and code.)
    • Her interrogator's name is SS-Hauptsturmführer von Linden, and she quickly compares him to Captain Hook.
    • Von Linden has a secretary/assistant named Fräulein Engel, who the narrator says can translate her English account into German.
    • The narrator is terrified of how the Nazis will execute her when they're done with her: she suspects kerosene and a match.
    • She's supposed to be giving up airfield locations and types of aircraft in use, but she says she really doesn't know any of this stuff.
    • The thought of aircraft leads the narrator to her friend, Maddie, whose identity papers she has instead of her own.
    • She says that she and Maddie flew to France together.

    The narrator titles the next section of her confession "Aircraft Types."

    • We find out about aircraft in a roundabout way as the narrator begins to write about Maddie Brodatt, her friend from Stockport, who flew her to France and once took her riding in the Pennines on her motorbike.
    • The narrator relates another story (stories within stories—keep them straight) about how in June 1938, before the war began, Maddie took another friend on that same ride.
    • Now we're with Maddie in 1938.
    • While Maddie and her friend Beryl are eating their picnic lunch (back in 1938), they see a Puss Moth crash.
    • The narrator breaks out of the story about Maddie and Beryl to say that she broke the pencil point laughing at one of her own jokes. We'll say this for the narrator: she hasn't lost her sense of humor.
    • And then Fräulein Engel sharpens the pencil, flicking the shavings into the narrator's eyes while SS-Scharführer Thibaut, another Gestapo underling, holds her head still.
    • When they go to help the pilot—we're back in 1938—Maddie and Beryl discover that the pilot is a girl.
    • This inspires Maddie to think she can make the leap from driving a motorbike to flying an airplane.
    • The narrator names another type of aircraft: the Lysander, which is what Maddie was flying when she dropped the narrator in France several weeks ago.
    • We learn that Maddie was supposed to land the Lysander, but couldn't because it was struck by antiaircraft fire on the way into France.
    • Maddie insisted the narrator parachute out before she tried to land the flaming aircraft.
    • The narrator's captors have shown her pictures of Maddie's crash, so she knows Maddie is dead.

    The narrator titles the next section "Some British Support for Anti-Semitism."

    • This section continues the story of how Maddie came to be piloting a Lysander in France at all.
    • During the week after the Puss Moth crash (still in 1938), Maddie uses newspaper clippings to figure out how a girl came to be piloting an airplane.
    • The Friday following the Saturday of the crash, Maddie discovers that the pilot is Dympna Wythenshawe, an aristocrat who has been giving joyrides in her other airplane all week.
    • Maddie also reads a story about a gathering to support a British fascist leader named Oswald Mosley, but thinks nothing of it.
    • The next day (Saturday, a week after the Puss Moth crash) Maddie sets off for Catton Park Aerodrome.
    • She gets stuck in the crowd around Mosley in Stockport, and gets in a fight with a bunch of British Nazi wannabes who knock her down, insult her granddad's bike shop, and make some choice remarks about his Jewish customers.
    • A group of much nicer people helps Maddie up, and she heads out of Stockport.
    • The narrator editorializes about how dumb fascists are throughout this section, and Fräulein Engel asks her to take it out because von Linden will not be pleased.
    • The narrator observes that Engel and Thibaut are both also scared of von Linden.

    The narrator titles the next section "Location of British Airfields."

    • This is the continuing story of "Maddie and the Puss Moth in 1938."
    • That Saturday afternoon, Maddie finally makes it to the Catton Park Aerodrome, which is shared space for the Royal Air Force (RAF) and civilian pilots.
    • Maddie watches the planes circling for a while and then runs into a woman who turns out to be Dympna Wythenshawe.
    • The narrator pauses to say that Dympna is a bit like her: raised in a castle, educated at a Swiss boarding school, speaks with a privileged accent. So now we know a teensy bit more about the narrator.
    • Dympna offers to give Maddie a ride as soon as her Puss Moth is fixed, and then she shows Maddie where the mechanics are working on it.
    • Maddie joins in and helps put the engine back together.
    • As they have tea later, Dympna offers to pick Maddie up for the official opening of Oakway Airfield next Saturday, and to let her and Beryl watch the festivities from the pilot's stand.
    • The narrator says she's had nothing to eat or drink since the day before and has been writing for nine hours, so now she's going to throw her pencil and indulge in a good cry. We don't blame her in the least.
  • Part 1, Chapter 2

    Ormaie 9.XI.43 JB-S

    • The narrator complains that the ink doesn't work and she wants her pencil back.
    • Thibaut interrupts the story with a note that says, "The English Flight Officer is telling the truth" (1.9.XI.43.3).
    • This really riles the narrator up because she is Scottish, not English. This explains all the William Wallace references.
    • The narrator describes her daily companions as "Underling-Sergeant Thibaut and On-Duty-Female-Guard Engel" (1.9.XI.43.5), which helps us understand their roles a bit better.
    • Apparently, von Linden finds her account interesting.
    • We learn that the narrator is forced to watch the interrogation of other prisoners, and also that the other prisoners hate her because she is the only one who has given their captors any information.

    The narrator titles the next section, "The Civil Air Guard (Some Figures)."

    • We're about to hear more about how Maddie came to fly the narrator into France in 1943. But to do that, we have to go back to 1938 first. Duh.
    • Maddie wants to learn to fly, but the training costs far more than her grandparents can afford.
    • Fortunately, though, Oakway Airfield opens up near her home, so she spends as much time as she can helping the mechanics there.
    • In October 1938, Britain starts the Civil Air Guard, and because Maddie already knows so much and so many people at the airfield, she is accepted for flight training against high odds.
    • Maddie earns her basic pilot's license in February 1939, six months before Hitler invades Poland on September 1, 1939 and Britain declares war on Germany on September 3.
    • Just before the war begins, Maddie flies Dympna's Puss Moth far up the Northumbrian coast, the journey the narrator used to take by train from London to Edinburgh while at school and university. Maddie sits in the cockpit weeping after she lands because she knows it will be so long before she gets to fly again.
    • Later, Dympna tells Maddie there will be opportunities for women to fly during the war, delivering aircraft and taxiing pilots.
    • Dympna adds that she has her own name in the ring for the Air Transport Auxiliary (ATA). Maddie isn't qualified for that, but Dympna swears not to forget her.
    • Dympna also promises to take Maddie to the Women's Auxiliary Air Force (WAAF) recruitment station the next day.
    • Women in the WAAF are trained to do many of the jobs normally done by men, and Maddie joins and becomes a radio operator.

    The narrator titles the next section "Some WAAF Trades."

    • The narrator thinks Maddie's WAAF training must have been like boarding school, which Maddie never attended—she went to a grammar school in Manchester instead.
    • Maddie is stationed at Oakway in late 1939 and early 1940, during what the narrator calls, "The Phoney War."

    The narrator titles the next section, "Telephonist."

    • The narrator describes how Aircraftwoman First Class Brodatt is working as a switchboard operator when the chief flight instructor for Oakway's RAF squadron gives her orders to move to the radio room, which is how Maddie becomes a radio operator.

    The narrator titles the next section, "Radio Operator."

    • The narrator relates a story about how Maddie guides in a lost crew in a Wellington bomber. It's a bit funny because Maddie is still transmitting when she thinks no one can hear her commentary.
    • That afternoon, the squadron commander stops Maddie to tell her the crew owes her their lives and to ask about her training.
    • When he finds out she has a pilot's license and has seen the runway from the air—and at night—he says he thinks it would be a good idea if she got a view of the runway from the cockpit of a Wellington bomber.
    • He offers Maddie a flight, which is right up her alley.

    The narrator titles the next section "Stooge."

    • This section describes Maddie's joyrides in Wellingtons in the spring of 1940.
    • It isn't totally illegal for Maddie to be aboard, but it isn't totally legit, either, so everyone's a little jumpy about it.
    • When the Wellington is fired on by trigger-happy antiaircraft gunners at another airfield, Maddie has to be lifted out of the plane by the crew because she's shaking so badly—Maddie hates gunfire.
    • Maddie is glad she's not the one flying into Europe.

    The narrator titles the next section "Signals Branch."

    • The narrator relates how Maddie is offered secret training and has to say yes before she's told what she'll be doing.
    • The narrator confesses she is making up the names of the people Maddie works with and jokes that at least she doesn't have scurvy thanks to the prison cabbage.
  • Part 1, Chapter 3

    Ormaie 10.XI.43 JB-S

    • The narrator begins by listing a variety of military acronyms and abbreviations. Good times.

    She titles the next section "Coastal Defense."

    • The narrator begins to give away secrets about Radar and Britain's coastal defense system, saying she doesn't think it matters now because Hitler's planned invasion of Britain already failed.
    • She decides she can't do it.
    • The narrator next describes how she and Engel have been baiting each other over the pen nib. First the narrator bends it, so Engel straightens it against her teeth—the narrator's teeth, that is; it would be kind of dumb to use her own teeth.
    • Then the narrator bends it again, so Engel uses it to prick her skin several times, the way the nurse at Engel's school would for a blood test.
    • Engel reminds the narrator that if she doesn't write the confession, the interrogation will begin again, so the narrator continues.

    The narrator titles the next section "Coastal Defense, Unabridged Version."

    • In this section, the narrator taunts the Nazis with how little they knew of Britain's Radar capabilities in 1940.
    • She also tells them how Maddie learns about Radar, which is so secret her title is only "Clerk, Special Duties," or clk/sd for short.
    • Maddie is made an officer and transferred to Maidsend on the Kentish coast in the summer of 1940, where she does not operate Radar but a telephone, which she uses to guide aircraft home.
    • Engel and Thibaut get in a minor argument.

    The narrator titles the next section "Coastal Defense, Damn It."

    • The narrator describes how an air battle looks on a Radar screen: green dots meeting up and disappearing as aircraft go down.
    • This leads her into a story about an incident in which Maddie communicates with a returning aircraft.
    • Maddie realizes the aircraft is German and the pilot thinks he's communicating with Calais, in occupied France, rather than Kent, in Britain.
    • The chief radio officer decides to bring the injured German plane in, but he needs someone who can speak German in order to fool the pilot into thinking he's headed for Calais.
    • He sends a runner to the wireless room to find someone, and the runner comes back with Queenie, a girl known for being more aristocratic than the Queen but also for being funny and brave.
    • With Maddie's help, Queenie pretends to be speaking from the German airfield at Calais, and they lure the limping bomber into a controlled crash at Kent.
    • The chief radio officer tells Queenie he'll need her help questioning the German pilot.
    • Maddie admires Queenie's ability to keep cool and fool the German pilot into believing he was headed for Calais.
    • That night, there's a German raid on the airfield, and Maddie and Queenie end up sharing cigarettes and an umbrella in the air raid shelter. They admire each other's work with the German pilot and become friends. Queenie tells Maddie she learned German first at her Swiss boarding school and was studying it at university before the war.
    • The afternoon following the air raid, everyone, including the captured German pilot, pitches in to repair the runway.
    • Maddie finds Queenie asleep in the canteen afterward. They share an iced bun, a cup of tea, and their fears—apparently nothing gives you an appetite like the threat of being bombed.
    • The air raid siren goes off again, like it's bound to do.
  • Part 1, Chapter 4

    Ormaie 11.XI.43 JB-S

    The narrator titles this section "Not Part of the Story."

    • Engel is frustrated with the narrator's winding tale and wants her to get to the point and write about how she met Maddie Brodatt.
    • Von Linden chides Engel for her lack of understanding of how literature works, and points out that the narrator has already written about this meeting: she is Queenie.
    • The narrator thinks about why she's writing about herself in the third person and says it's easier that way. It's easier both to write the story from one point of view (Maddie's) and to think of Queenie (her former self) in the third person.
    • The narrator doesn't think of herself as Queenie anymore—it was her nickname in another life.
    • She is now writing on a Jewish doctor's prescription pad because she has run out of the nice hotel stationery.
    • She writes a couple of snarky prescriptions for Engel, whom she thinks needs a boyfriend in the worst way.
    • The narrator reflects on her current state of health (bruises and possible blood poisoning) and her previous escape attempts, then tries to think of a way to kill herself efficiently.
    • She can't remember where she stopped the story, so Engel reminds her that the air raid siren went off.

    The narrator titles the next section "Antiaircraft Gunner."

    • Maddie and Queenie shoot down a German Messerschmitt 109 together after taking over an antiaircraft gun from a dying gunner.
    • Because Queenie shares that one of her fears is getting lost, after the air raid, Maddie decides to teach Queenie to navigate.
    • Maddie gets two bicycles out on a rainy, blustery day and tells Queenie her job is to get them to the Green Man Pub.
    • To make it more fun, Queenie pretends to be a German spy. When it becomes clear they won't make it to the pub in time for lunch and Queenie gets a puncture in her tire, Queenie leads them to a nearby farm, where she fakes a working-class Scottish accent to get on the farmer's wife's good side.
    • The farmer's wife feeds them lunch and helps fix the tire, which Maddie discovers Queenie punctured on purpose as part of the game.
    • Maddie tells Queenie she likes the game too much and is too good at it.
    • They make it to the pub in time for dinner, where they run into Squadron Leader Creighton having dinner with an English intelligence officer.
    • Squadron Leader Creighton introduces them to the English intelligence officer as the two officers who brought in the wounded German pilot.
    • Queenie has fun flirting with the English intelligence officer, and Creighton tells him she and Maddie make an amazing team.
    • The narrator steps out of the story at this point to provide some commentary on how the English intelligence officer, whose name she never learned, was totally playing God with their lives—she nicknames him the "Bloody Machiavellian English Intelligence Officer playing God"—but she didn't care at the time because she was so honored to be chosen.
    • The narrator winds down the entry in despair, saying she has run out of paper now.
  • Part 1, Chapter 5

    Ormaie 16.XI.43 JB-S

    • The narrator relates what has been going on in the Ormaie Gestapo headquarters where she is being held. It's a former hotel known as the Chateau de Bordeaux.
    • Her captors have been showing her pictures of the wreckage of Maddie's airplane, with the pilot's cockpit enlarged so she can see the details. They are so thoughtful like that.
    • She has also been on kitchen duty for the past few days because one of the workers was sent to prison—a different prison, because the Nazis have quite a collection going—for stealing cabbage.
    • She confesses that she let the cook grope her breasts in exchange for old recipe cards to write on. Ick.
    • She is afraid she will run out of time or paper or both, and will never be able to finish her story.
    • The narrator informs us that her cell (formerly a hotel bedroom) is near the location where they torture prisoners, so she hears the results all the time.
    • She and von Linden argue about Orwellian socialism, and she claims that von Linden thinks of her as no more human than a wireless set.
    • Now she is writing, but unfortunately Thibaut is in charge at the moment, and she hates him.
    • She plans to beg von Linden for another week to keep writing—she'll ask in German, which always puts him in a good mood.

    The narrator titles the next section "Random Aircraft," and lists nine different types.

    The narrator titles the next section "Air Taxi with the ATA."

    • In this section, the narrator relates the story of Queenie's first flight.
    • Queenie gets her first shot at air travel when ATA pilot Dympna Wythenshawe shows up at the Maidsend air base with a ferry pilot and an Avro Anson.
    • Dympna finds Maddie and convinces her to take the chance to do the flight in order to get some airtime in.
    • The two of them together convince a very reluctant Queenie (afraid of heights and of being sick) to come along.
    • Queenie has a really rough time of it at first, crouching in the back to keep from looking out the windows, but then Dympna has her climb into the front seat.
    • The three women witness a "green flash," a mirage in which the sun looks green.
    • This flight leads to Maddie's transfer from the WAAF to the ATA, which means she gets to fly again.
    • Meanwhile, Queenie is transferred from her job as a wireless operator to the SOE—the Special Operations Executive.
    • Maddie and Queenie are separated for almost a year, and Queenie asks Maddie to write to her at home: Craig Castle, Castle Craig in Aberdeenshire. This is so they can avoid the military censors.
    • They see each other three times that year: when Queenie visits and they spend three days exploring the Pennines on Maddie's motorbike; when Queenie's favorite brother Jamie is shot down in the North Sea and has to have all his toes and four fingers amputated due to frostbite; and when Queenie does her parachute training at Oakway, the airfield near Maddie's house.
    • The narrator shifts back to the present to describe her fear that her work won't be good enough for von Linden, who examines her hair and mentions kerosene, a popular means of execution.
    • She is afraid and can only think of her ancestor William Wallace and of the dying Admiral Nelson saying, "Kiss me, Hardy."
  • Part 1, Chapter 6

    Ormaie 17.XI.43 JB-S

    • As it turns out, the kerosene is for the narrator's head lice.
    • The narrator shares that last night there was an air raid and she was on her own above ground for three hours, hoping for a direct hit from the RAF.
    • Von Linden gives her a single white pill that the narrator thinks is cyanide. It's aspirin.
    • The head lice treatment and the aspirin are all part of "Operation Cinderella," a plan to pretty the narrator up before they bring in an American Nazi sympathizer to interview her for a radio show aimed at American troops.
    • The narrator knows that because she overheard classified information before the speakers knew she could understand German, she is now a "Night and Fog" prisoner—a.k.a. "Nacht und Nebel," or just NN for short.
    • This means her captors need to make her disappear.
    • The narrator wonders about von Linden and what he does in civilian life because he is so good at reading his prisoners and figuring out exactly where their breaking points are.
    • She also wonders what happened to all the hotel furnishings of the Chateau de Bordeaux.
    • The narrator and Engel are working on some translations for von Linden, which will give credence to the story she is to tell the interviewer: she's supposed to say she's being humanely treated and has been given translation work to do while she awaits trial.
    • She knows if she tells the interviewer what her captors want, she will buy herself a bit more time to finish her story.

    The narrator titles the next section "Ferry Pilot."

    • We're back in Maddie's story now.
    • When Maddie transfers to the ATA (Air Transport Auxiliary), she is stationed at Oakway.
    • She's a civilian again, but there are other perks, like petrol (gasoline) and chocolate and getting to live at home.
    • Maddie's training is cut short because she's needed in the air.
    • The narrator says an ATA pilot dies every week because they fly without navigation aids in weather fighter pilots won't face.
    • Maddie's first job is to ferry a damaged Lysander for repairs.

    The narrator titles the next section "Not a Safe Job."

    • Still hanging out with Maddie here.
    • The ground crew cannot believe a woman is going to fly the broken Lysander, but Maddie convinces them.
    • Even so, she has a rough flight and barely gets the plane down at Elmtree.
    • She goes to the canteen to get a snack and runs into Theo Lyons, the sister of a pilot she knew at Maidsend.
    • Theo tells Maddie about RAF Special Duties flights, where she flies planes bound for night landings in France—in other words, planes designed to drop off and pick up spies and Resistance workers.
    • Maddie takes Theo's advice, and becomes quite expert at this type of flying, which is partly how she ends up flying the narrator into France some time later.
    • The narrator admits she doesn't have a clue where the secret airfields are, which is a good thing since she can't spill the beans.
  • Part 1, Chapter 7

    Ormaie, 18.XI.43 JB-S

    • The narrator is secretly writing when she's supposed to be translating because she's gotten ahead of Engel in her translations.
    • Engel has been talking a lot and has let slip that if the narrator is lucky, she'll be sent to Ravensbrück, a concentration camp where prisoners move rubble until they can't work, at which point they are hanged.
    • If she's not lucky, Engel says, she'll be sent to Natzwieler-Struthof, a special concentration camp for Nacht und Nebel prisoners, where they vanish. Mostly men are sent here, but some women are sent for live medical experiments.
    • The narrator has worked out for herself that if she is very lucky, she will somehow get herself shot first.
    • She updates her list of ten things she's afraid of. She's changed fear of the dark to fear of being cold and fear of the college porter to fear of von Linden.
    • Also, she can't believe she was ever afraid of getting old—it looks fairly unlikely that that's something she'll have to face.
    • The narrator has been taken to see von Linden's cushy office so she can pretend to the American radio interviewer that she does all her translating work there.
    • Tied to a steel table with Thibaut on guard, the narrator decides to write a story about Maddie's visit to Scotland.
    • Maddie and the narrator were never in Scotland together, and it's not clear this story ever happened at all, and the narrator might very well be making it up.
    • Either way, it takes place in November 1941.
    • Maddie gets stuck near Aberdeen after delivering a plane and isn't sure where to stay.
    • After a few false starts, she ends up near Craig Castle, the narrator's ancestral childhood home.
    • The narrator pauses to say that because she is very upper-crust and Maddie is very much not, they would never have met without the war, and their meeting was unlikely even with a war on.
    • At the castle, Maddie finds the narrator's brother Jamie, minus all his toes and four fingers but otherwise recovered from his dip in the North Sea, alone with the Castle Craig Irregulars, eight working-class war evacuees.
    • Maddie helps Jamie get the boys to bed, and then they sit in the small library and talk about flying.
    • Maddie tells Jamie he might have a chance of flying again as a Special Duties pilot, and advises him to talk to his commanding officer about it.
    • Later, Maddie sleeps in the narrator's bedroom, leaving the window open even though it's cold, in case the narrator come flying back unexpectedly, like the children in Peter Pan.
  • Part 1, Chapter 8

    Ormaie 20.XI.43 JB-S

    • In this chapter, the narrator relates the story of her interview with the American Nazi sympathizer journalist, Georgia Penn.
    • The narrator has been cleaned up and given back her blouse and scarf for the interview, but Penn still doesn't think she looks well.
    • With Engel and von Linden looking on, the interview begins.
    • Georgia Penn asks for the truth, and the narrator says she will give it to her, and then proceeds to lie through her teeth about her treatment because she wants the extra week to write that all that lying will buy her.
    • The journalist asks if the narrator knows that the place has been nicknamed the Chateau des Bourreaux—the Castle of Butchers.
    • After the interview, von Linden asks the narrator if she's read Goethe.
    • The narrator has discovered that von Linden was the headmaster of a boys' school before the war, and has a daughter slightly younger than her.
  • Part 1, Chapter 9

    Ormaie 21.XI.43 JB-S

    • The narrator is now writing on sheet music for flute and piano.

    The narrator titles the next section "Wartime Administrative Formalities."

    • The narrator picks up the thread of Maddie's story in the summer of 1942, when the SOE starts grooming Maddie—though Maddie didn't know it at the time.
    • Maddie is being trained to fly at night and to fly while people parachute out—twice the narrator does a practice jump from Maddie's plane, but they aren't allowed to speak to each other.
    • After a rough landing at an RAF Special Duties Airfield, Maddie is asked to meet with someone.
    • It turns out to be the same English intelligence officer—the Bloody Machiavellian English Intelligence Officer playing God—who recruited the narrator. Maddie is told she'll be doing air taxi work: picking up and dropping off in secret, at night, and so on.
    • After Maddie agreed, the BMEIOPG (as we like to call him for short) tells her to tell her co-pilot he'd merely found her clothing ration coupons—and then he produces her clothing ration coupons, which freaks Maddie out.
    • The narrator has to stop here because she's crying so hard.
  • Part 1, Chapter 10

    Ormaie 22.XI.43 JB-S

    • The narrator continues the story of Maddie's life in the SOE.
    • As the BMEIOPG promised, Maddie's air taxi work remains much the same, but now she's transporting people she isn't allowed to talk to, and who obviously aren't pilots.
    • In September 1942, she ferries Queenie from undisclosed location to undisclosed location, but it's dark and Queenie doesn't identify herself until they hit the ground because she doesn't want to distract Maddie during the flight.
    • That night, Maddie sleeps at the RAF Special Duties base.
    • When Queenie and the rest of her team return triumphantly from France the next morning with several shot-down American pilots and French ministers, champagne, and Chanel No. 5, Queenie is beyond thrilled with the success of her first mission.
    • Here the narrator pauses to ruminate on the importance of freedom.
    • She also realizes she's at the point where she'll have to begin talking about herself before her arrival in Ormaie, and she's not happy about it.
    • She wants to keep thinking about flying with Maddie and about the lovely dream she had where she and Maddie were safe and headed home.
    • The narrator is in a lot of trouble with Engel and Thibaut for pranking Engel that morning, and she distracts herself by inventing a flirtatious relationship between the two of them.
    • She says the general air has become more urgent around the prison—something is going on, but she doesn't know what.
    • She is feeling tired and lightheaded, and decides to list all her flights with Maddie to help herself get through.

    The narrator titles the next section "RAF Special Duties, Operational Cross-Country."

    • This section continues the story of Maddie's life as an air taxi pilot for the SOE.
    • In April 1943, Maddie and Queenie find themselves at the airfield where Jamie is now stationed; Queenie is hustled off for a mission, and Maddie knows she won't return until the next morning.
    • Jamie and another pilot are bound for a pick-up/drop-off in France, and a less experienced pilot whom the narrator calls "Michael" is supposed to follow them, find another point, and turn around. Just for practice.
    • Maddie is totally jealous of Michael, so Jamie suggests she fly along.
    • After some arguing and working out the logistics of it, the others decide it's okay, so Maddie flies to France with Michael.
    • Michael does fairly well, but Maddie has to remind him not to follow the other planes all the way to Paris.
    • Maddie and the squadron leader talk about the trip while Michael walks off whistling "The Last Time I Saw Paris."

    The narrator titles the next section "Debriefing."

    • This section continues later the same night.
    • Maddie makes it to bed at about 4:00AM—she's sharing a room with Queenie, but she's too excited to sleep.
    • Queenie comes in at 5:30AM, turns on all the lights, and sits down in front of the mirror.
    • Her hair is pulled back starkly, and she's wearing harsh make-up; she doesn't look like herself.
    • As Maddie watches, she realizes Queenie's throat and arms are covered with bruises.
    • Maddie tells Queenie about the flight to France, and Queenie reveals her secret identity: as Eva Seiler, a German liaison, she interrogates prisoners.
    • One of them attacked her that night, which is how she got the bruises.
    • Queenie is clearly shaken up, and Maddie holds her sobbing friend until she falls asleep.
    • As she finishes her story, the narrator is very tired, but a new guard keeps burning the back of her neck with his cigarette every time she stops writing, so she covers pages and pages with the poetry of Robert Burns.
    • The poet's name makes her think of Maddie, burned up in the wreckage of her plane.
  • Part 1, Chapter 11

     Ormaie 23.XI.43 JB-S

    • The narrator picks up the story the next day. Von Linden comes in and yells at the guard who has been treating her so badly that all she can write is nonsense.
    • The narrator also reports that Engel has clearly been crying.
    • What's up with the Nazis not acting like Nazis today?

    The narrator titles the next section "Special Operations Training."

    • We're back in April 1943 now, right after Eva Seiler's violent interrogation.
    • The narrator is given some time off to think about whether she wants to continue in this line of work.
    • She goes home, where her mother says she'll want to know every detail of what happened after the war is over, and the narrator replies that she'll never be able to tell.
    • On this trip, her French nanny knits her a lovely new pullover from old wool—the same pullover that has been such a comfort to her in France.
    • The narrator admits that she loves playing Eva Seiler, but the higher-ups think she needs a change, so she agrees to go undercover in France as a wireless operator.
    • The average life expectancy of a wireless operator in enemy territory is six weeks, and she has been in France six weeks today.
    • The narrator describes the training she did for this operation in the summer and early fall of 1943: finding her way around an unfamiliar city, learning lots of code, going through fake interrogations, and essentially playing at being a spy, which sounds like more fun than actually being a spy.
    • And finally comes the waiting and waiting to go "operational."

    The narrator titles the next section "An Irregular Ferry Flight."

    • This begins the story of how Maddie ended up being the one to drop the narrator in France.
    • Everyone involved in Operation Dogstar (the narrator's mission) gathers at the RAF Special Duties base sometime in October 1943.
    • This includes Maddie, the narrator, Jamie (call sign John), and Michael, the pilot Maddie flew to France with a few months ago.

    The narrator titles the next section "Operation Dogstar," which is the name of the operation that sends her to France.

    • She begins by talking about Ormaie and how horrible it is now. She has a personal connection because her grandmother was from Ormaie, so she visited family there before the war.
    • She also says she chose to study German because she loves it, and she hates Hitler for taking away any opportunity to experience Germany.
    • Now she flashes back to that night in October.
    • Everyone involved in Operation Dogstar is sitting around listening to the radio for their secret signal.
    • They get the signal, but their squadron leader (call sign Peter) still hasn't arrived—then Peter's wife calls to say that Peter has been in a car accident and won't be able to fly tonight.
    • There's a lot of confusion and arguing over what to do, and the narrator finally suggests that Maddie fly the plane.
    • Jamie tries everything to convince them that this is not okay, but finally Maddie says she can authorize her own flight.
    • Maddie calls her commanding officer and doesn't really give him any details, so he tells her to go ahead.
  • Part 1, Chapter 12

    Ormaie 24.XI.43 JB-S

    • Von Linden is both shocked and excited to discover that the narrator is Eva Seiler—this could mean a big promotion for him.
    • He keeps stopping by at night to discuss German literature with the narrator; apparently he really misses teaching. We don't blame him, given his current situation.
    • He wants proof that the narrator is Eva Seiler, and she proves it by getting him to tell her his daughter's name.
    • Now the narrator returns to the story of that night in October when Maddie dropped her in France.
    • The sergeant tries to give Maddie a revolver, which she refuses, so he gives her a new kind of pen instead—an Eterpen that comes with its own ink and dries quickly. It's good for marking maps in the air.
    • Turns out Maddie is better with firearms than she lets on—Jamie took her shooting on her second and third trips to Craig Castle.
    • Maddie and Queenie get ready for takeoff. In the air, Maddie tells Queenie she's not taking everything seriously enough.
    • Maddie's worried because of flashes of light in the clouds.
    • Queenie falls asleep in the back of the plane, but she wakes up when the tail is hit and Maddie plunges into a dive to try to put out the fire.
    • They manage to find the landing site, but Maddie tells Queenie to prepare to parachute out because the landing will be rough. Read: possibly more of a crash than a landing.
    • Maddie wants to drop Queenie by parachute and try to fly home without landing in France at all.
    • Queenie flashes an answer in Morse code to the landing site so they'll know who she is when she jumps.
  • Part 1, Chapter 13

    Ormaie 25.XI.43 JB-S

    • Von Linden and the narrator have a fight, and von Linden orders her mouth scrubbed out with carbolic acid.
    • The fight starts when the narrator can't listen to the tortured French girl scream anymore.
    • She yells at the French girl to lie to her captors, to give them anything, and the French girl asks if that's what she does.
    • Von Linden (who is no dummy, despite being a Nazi) tells her to answer the question. It's a trap.
    • So instead she starts taunting him about his daughter, Isolde, and he orders her mouth scrubbed out, but he won't do it himself.
    • The carbolic acid hasn't happened yet, though, and the pen and paper are there for her the next morning as usual.
    • The narrator returns to the story of the drop. Maddie still can't get the plane down, so she tells Queenie she'll take her up to three thousand feet and let her parachute out.
    • The narrator writes about the French girl's execution.
    • There is a guillotine in the courtyard, and the narrator and the French girl are taken out to it.
    • The narrator tells the French girl her name, and as she's strapped to the guillotine, the French girl tells the narrator that her name is Marie.
    • It's now right after Marie's execution. Von Linden has given the narrator fifteen minutes to write about it, and he's watching her himself this time.
    • He orders her to finish the story of her arrival in France.
    • Queenie asks Maddie to tell her when to jump.
    • Maddie's going to try to land, but not until her passenger is out because of the danger of crashing.
    • Queenie says, "Kiss me, Hardy," and Maddie kisses Queenie's hand, which has been on her shoulder since they were hit.
    • Then Queenie jumps out and Maddie is alone.
  • Part 1, Chapter 14

     Ormaie 28.XI.43 JB-S

    • The narrator begins this section by talking about the Skye terrier Mary, Queen of Scots carried with her to her execution.
    • She says she has been allowed to spend the past three days reading over all her work and checking it—von Linden is a schoolmaster to the end.
    • She realizes she has not once written her own name on anything, so she writes it twice, once with and once without the title: Lady Julia Lindsay MacKenzie Wallace Beaufort-Stuart.
    • Now we know what the "JB-S" stands for.
    • She says she always thinks of herself as Julie, not as Lady Julia or any of her other aliases, and this is what the people she loves call her.
    • She thinks of the execution of Edith Cavell and the last words of Admiral Nelson, "Kiss me, Hardy."
    • The last part of this section is a note to von Linden from his superiors, ordering him to send Flight Officer Beaufort-Stuart directly to Natzweiler-Struthof to be executed by lethal injection if she survives the six-week experimentation period.
    • There is the suggestion that von Linden has been too lenient already.
  • Part 2, Chapter 1

    We've numbered the chapters in Part 2 ourselves according to page breaks, and recommend you do the same just to keep track. Maddie's way too cool for chapter numbers, or even dates.

    • Time for Mindblowing Revelation #1: Maddie is not dead. She's very much alive, and for the rest of the book, she'll by our guide. And by guide, we mean narrator.

    We'd like to interrupt your regularly scheduled programming for a brief orientation to Part 2: Maddie's narration is a bit easier to follow than Julie's because the story has caught up to her—and because Julie has already given us the backstory of the their friendship, Maddie can tell us what's happening in more or less linear time.

    We do back up from Julie's last entry on November 28 to October 11, though, the day Maddie dropped Julie over France and then crashed the plane.

    That's all you need to know to get your bearings on where we are now, Shmoopsters, so without further ado, let's get back to the story.

    • Like Julie, Maddie is writing the story down—she's using her fancy new Eterpen and her pilot's notebook.
    • Maddie somehow ended up with Julie's fake identity papers, which is a bad deal for Julie since she doesn't have the papers that identify her as Katherina Habicht, which was supposed to be her fake identity in France.
    • Maddie doesn't have any identification papers herself because she's not supposed to be in France at all, which is also a bad deal.
    • Maddie figures she'll be court-martialed if she writes any of this down, but she doesn't have anything else to do and she figures she'll be court-martialed anyway, plus she'll have to do an accident report, so she gets started on it.

    Maddie titles this section "Accident Notes."

    • She reports that she crashed in a field called Damask, near Ormaie, France on October 11, 1943.
    • She describes what Julie has already told us: the antiaircraft fire, the damage to the plane, getting stuck in the climb, forcing Julie to parachute out before she tried to land.
    • Maddie talks about surviving the crash and being met by an SOE reception committee, including a man code-named Paul, whom she ferried once in England.
    • At first they think she's Verity, but she corrects them, telling them her name is Kittyhawk. Everyone is super impressed that she was able to land and deliver the explosives she was carrying without setting them off.
    • Now we find out why Julie thinks Maddie is dead. The SOE operatives shot a German sentry earlier and need a way to dispose of the body; they also need to make the crash look accidental instead of like someone was trying to land a plane there.
    • They take Maddie's clothes (someone thoughtfully loans her a coat and a girl named Mitraillette gives her a pullover) and dress the German sentry in them.
    • Then they take everything they need out of the plane, put everything they need to get rid of in the plane, and put the German sentry in the cockpit.
    • And then they set fire to the plane, which all explains why Julie thinks Maddie is dead.
    • Two days later—October 13, 1943—Maddie is hiding in a tiny little space in the loft of the barn on the farm where this SOE circuit is based.
    • She's a great danger to everyone around, and she hasn't told anyone that even though she's not religious, she is Jewish, which could add another wrinkle to the problem, to say the least.
    • She has spent most of the past two days sleeping, which she says is just as well because she's exhausted and the place has been crawling with Nazis taking pictures of the crash site.
    • She misses Julie.
  • Part 2, Chapter 2

    • It's October 14, and Maddie is still hiding out in the barn, where she's learning to fire a Colt .32 revolver.
    • She doesn't mind shooting except that Paul gets a little touchy-feely while he's teaching her. Mitraillette, who is one of the daughters of the family that owns the farm, says he does that to all the women. Ick.
    • The explosives are hidden under hay in the old wooden barn, which is not exactly standard fire safety procedure, so Maddie tries not to think about it.
    • Maddie has heard that Julie, whom she is trying her best to remember to call Verity, has made contact with the right people and started her mission, which is to gain access to the building records of the Chateau de Bordeaux, where the Ormaie Gestapo is based, and blow it up.
    • Maddie has also learned that this SOE group is called Damask after their oldest member, an eighty-three-year-old rose grower.
    • Everyone is trying to figure out how to get Verity's identity papers to her so she can get into City Hall and gain access to the building records.
    • It turns out that Käthe Habicht, Julie's intended false identity, means Kitty Hawk in German, which Maddie thinks is sweet but probably stupid.
  • Part 2, Chapter 3

    • It's October 21, 1943, ten days since Julie and Maddie arrived in France.
    • Maddie is still hiding out in the barn, and she's heard that another SOE pilot crashed on October 18, so she's no longer the only one in the area.
    • The SOE in Britain will have to send a larger plane to get her, the other SOE pilot, and the two refugees she was supposed to bring back on her trip, but the weather is so bad they can't do it.
    • Most of this chapter is a list of Maddie's Top Ten Fears, which, like Julie's, have changed since she landed in France.
    • She's now more afraid of fire than of cold, and has added the Nazi concentration camps to the list.
    • In addition to bombs falling on her grandparents, she's afraid of bombs falling on Jamie.
    • She's also really afraid of Paul, whom she warned off with his own gun when he came up to her loft to try to get a little action—she realizes that if anyone tries to rape her, she'll have to let it happen because she can't risk screaming. Which is a terrible thing to realize.
    • What's worse, Julie has disappeared and there's been no contact with her for a week.
    • Maddie's greatest fear is that Julie is being held prisoner by the Ormaie Gestapo.
  • Part 2, Chapter 4

    • Maddie has been hiding out on the farm for over two weeks, and they still haven't heard from Julie.
    • Maddie needs to remember to call her Verity.
    • The new plan is for a photographer to take Maddie's picture so they can turn Käthe Habicht's identity card into one for her. Maddie will pretend to be the farm family's somewhat dim cousin from Alsace, which they hope will explain why she doesn't talk much and can't speak French or German well.
    • The photographer also works for the Gestapo; he's taken photographs of the ruined plane and the eleven radio sets in the back.
    • They've heard rumors that the Ormaie Gestapo captured an English airman, and they're afraid it might be Julie.
    • Maddie asks the photographer to hold back the shots of the crash as long as possible, but to give the Gestapo the images of the wireless sets. She knows the crash pictures will upset Julie, but the wireless sets will give her something to work with: they are dummies planted to make the mission look like just another drop-off of wireless operators, but Julie can make up code to go with them and feed it to the Nazis all day long.
    • Mind-blowing Revelation #2: those eleven sets of code Julie was fretting over giving her captors at the beginning of the book? She made every bit of it up. She told us she was good at pretending.
    • The photographer brings Maddie some warm trousers of his wife's. She's so grateful she cries, and Paul makes some sexual harassment jokes about them because he's kind of horrible like that.
    • She hates Paul so much she would love to kill him with his own gun. We confess we wouldn't shed too many tears over him.
  • Part 2, Chapter 5

    • As it turns out, Maddie is staying with the Thibaut family, who are working for the French Resistance even as their son, Etienne, is working for the Nazis at the Ormaie Gestapo.
    • Because Etienne's family is local, they're required to serve the Gestapo staff a home-cooked meal once a month. We assume while seriously covering up any Resistance activities.
    • This month, Etienne shows up for Sunday dinner wearing a serious goose-egg. When his family gives him a hard time about it, the woman who comes with them, who we can only assume is Fräulein Engel, tells Mitraillette, the eldest Thibaut daughter, that he got the injury from a woman.
    • It's been three weeks since their arrival in France, and Maddie still doesn't know where Julie is, but she's pretty sure Julie is responsible for Etienne's injury.
  • Part 2, Chapter 6

    • In this section, Maddie writes about her unsuccessful attempt to get out of Dodge (read: France) on November 7, 1943.
    • After a fifty-kilometer ride in the trunk of a sputtering old car with a bunch of chickens, Maddie arrives at the rendezvous point.
    • Papa Thibaut, Amélie, Mitraillette, and Paul ride in the car, for various decoy reasons. They don't have to ride in the trunk.
    • At the rendezvous point, they have to wait a couple of hours for the plane that's supposed to be picking up Maddie, a hunted wireless operator, and the other SOE pilot.
    • They spend the time laying out a makeshift runway.
    • The other pilot turns out to be Jamie Beaufort-Stuart, with whom Maddie gets quite cozy to the tune of a gigantic kiss, an arm around her waist, and a shoulder to cry on. All for undercover spy reasons, of course, though it doesn't look like either of them really minds it, and we have our own suspicions about that relationship.
    • Jamie and Maddie manage to have a private conversation about Verity's whereabouts, in which Maddie tells him they have Georgia Penn on the case.
    • Mind-blowing Revelation #3: Georgia Penn gets paid by the Nazis and hosts a propaganda radio program for them, which we already knew. However, she also is one of the best people in Europe for walking into prison camps and other awful places and finding people, and right now she's looking for Verity. The interview thing is a cover.
    • The plane arrives and can't land because of a crosswind, which means Maddie, Jamie, and the wireless operator are still stuck in France, and they all have to head back to their hiding places.
    • Before they leave, Jamie advises Paul to let Maddie help identify good landing sites and work on engines.
    • Paul asks if she'd be willing to try working on explosives, and Maddie agrees.
    • Then Paul, because he's pretty awful, makes another sex joke about Maddie to Jamie, who heartily threatens him in return.
    • They forget about that because a Nazi plane flies over and they all have to take cover.
    • As they drive back to their hiding spots, Maddie and the wireless operator ride outside the car so they can jump and run if they get stopped.
    • The wireless operator tells Maddie that Damask is a good circuit and Paul is a good organizer, despite his grossness.
    • Maddie worries about the wireless operator and hopes she makes it out of France.
  • Part 2, Chapter 7

    • Maddie is now living with the Thibauts as Katherina Habicht, Maman Thibaut's cousin's daughter from Alsace.
    • She's staying in Etienne's old room and has begun using one of his childhood notebooks to write in.
    • One day, as she and Amélie and Mitraillette are out on their bicycles looking for possible landing sites, they run into Etienne.
    • Mitraillette does a good job of lying to him, and he buys the story about a distant cousin.
    • He and Amélie get into a fight, and because he's a jerk, Etienne starts telling his little sister what they do to prisoners who don't cooperate.
    • Maddie doesn't understand any of this conversation until the Thibaut sisters relay it to her later, and then she's really upset because she knows if Julie isn't dead, she's a prisoner of the Gestapo, and it's Maddie's job to find her.
  • Part 2, Chapter 8

    • Maddie has found a nice landing field for the SOE. She thinks this must be a great place to fly in peacetime, but now she needs better landmarks and cover sites.
  • Part 2, Chapter 9

    • After five weeks in France, Maddie's legs are extremely strong thanks to all the cycling; she takes Paul to see the field so he can authorize pictures for the SOE's approval.
    • She's learning to wire explosives.
    • Georgia Penn's application for an interview inside the Ormaie Gestapo has been turned down by Ferber, an upper management Nazi, but Penn plans to try to get around this by going straight to the Ormaie captain.
    • The SOE is going to give picking up Maddie, Jamie, and other refugees another try tomorrow night, November 16.
  • Part 2, Chapter 10

    • Maddie misses the plane back to England because the choke of the car she's riding in keeps breaking down, so she's too late.
    • Most of this chapter is a description of Maddie, Paul, and the French driver arguing with each other in various languages because the French driver doesn't believe Maddie can fix the choke.
    • Finally Maddie pulls the Colt .32, and threatens Paul and the driver until they let her fix it. But they're still late for the rendezvous.
    • No one is left except a few resistance workers, one of whom gives Maddie the warm RAF boots Jamie left behind for her.
    • She cries on the way back.
  • Part 2, Chapter 11

    • Georgia Penn has located Julie inside the Ormaie Gestapo.
    • It's now November 20, and Maddie and Julie have been in France for six weeks.
    • Miss Penn reports that Julie told the Gestapo she was a wireless operator, so they've been spending their time trying to get made-up code out of her instead of learning anything about her real mission: blowing up the Ormaie Gestapo.
    • Miss Penn takes Mitraillette and Maddie out to sit on a bench and pretends to be working on knitting while she tells them what she learned about Verity.
    • She reports that Verity has been tortured.
    • She also passes on the information Verity managed to give her about the Chateau de Bordeaux—she says Verity seems to think she can complete her mission even as a prisoner.
    • Verity also thinks Engel is about to turn, so the Resistance should make it easy for her to find them.
    • Maddie admits she used to be jealous of all Julie's advantages and accomplishments, but she feels awful because all she can think of is Julie's situation now.
  • Part 2, Chapter 12

    • Maddie has a dream in which she and Julie are flying Dympna's plane together, but the plane is stuck in the climb like the night she dropped Julie in France.
    • They are stuck in a beautiful sky and a crashing plane.
    • Julie offers to help fly, and suddenly the plane rights itself and everything is fine.
  • Part 2, Chapter 13

    • Maddie believes she would know if Julie were dead.
    • This feeling is sparked the day Amélie comes home in hysterics because she and some of her school friends were near the Gestapo headquarters and witnessed the guillotine execution of a girl who had been a few years ahead of her in school.
    • Amélie reports that there were two girls by the guillotine, but she didn't stick around to see whether they executed the second one.
    • Maddie remembers the time she visited Paris with her grandparents before the Depression and went up in the Eiffel Tower with her granddad.
    • She knows the second girl must have been Julie, but she doesn't believe Julie is dead—she knows Julie must think she's dead, though, because of the pictures of the crash site, so she reasons that things aren't always what they seem.
    • Allied planes are going over every night, on their way to bomb munitions factories and launch sites.
    • Maddie knows the RAF is trying to avoid hitting Ormaie because of the civilian population, which is why Julie was sent to attack from the ground.
    • Maddie concludes that she won't believe Julie is dead until she actually sees it happen.
  • Part 2, Chapter 14

    • During the Nazis' monthly Sunday dinner at the Thibaut farm on November 28, Paul takes Maddie away to another house to practice shooting guns and wiring explosives. This gets her out of the Nazis' way, since she's a suspicious character.
    • Maddie—as Käthe—is now doing some intelligence work. Because Engel won't recognize her and she'll be gone in a few weeks (she hopes), it's her job to deliver a message about the Resistance to Engel.
    • In order for Maddie to get a good look at Engel, as she's never seen her before, Paul and Maddie come back around the time Engel has to get out of the Nazis' Mercedes to open the farm gate. The Gestapo travels in style.
    • Paul helps Engel, making such a show of groping her while he's at it that nobody notices Maddie.
    • Maddie observes that Engel is about her age and would be good-looking under the right circumstances.
    • She also notices that the German captain looks haggard. She thinks it's probably due to the fact that he's in trouble with Nikolaus Ferber, his superior officer, over the Georgia Penn interview and over the fact that a set of keys went missing in the Gestapo last week.
  • Part 2, Chapter 15

    • Maddie has a terrible dream in which she's trying to set up a guillotine to work cleanly.
    • She passes a note to Engel that tells her where and how to contact the Resistance if she wants to—Maddie knows if Engel decides to turn on her, she's dead.
    • When she passes the note, Engel asks her, in English, if she's Maddie Brodatt.
    • Maddie lies and gives her name as Käthe Habicht, but as Engel leaves she remembers that Käthe doesn't understand English.
  • Part 2, Chapter 16

    • Maddie gets Engel's answer to the Resistance's overtures from the café where Engel was supposed to leave her reply.
    • A bus boy hands Maddie a scarf and asks if it's hers, so she takes it.
    • When she gets back to the Thibaut's farm, she realizes it's Julie's scarf—and she remembers that Engel is a chemist.
    • Maddie remembers how her dad's ties used to smell like him, and she tries to smell Julie on the scarf, but there's not a trace left.
    • Maddie, Mitraillette, and Amélie iron the scarf to bring out the secret message, which says that nineteen prisoners from Poitiers are being transported to a concentration camp. Their bus is going to swing by Ormaie to pick up five more, including Julie.
  • Part 2, Chapter 17

    • Maddie decides to write about what happened as if it were an accident report.
    • Mitraillette has tried to give her something to knock her out already, but she can't take it until she gets the story down.

    Maddie titles the next section "Incident Report."

    • She notes that Damask circuit's mission that night is to sabotage the Poitou River Bridge to stop the German bus carrying Allied prisoners.
    • Paul does an amazing job of organizing the mission and keeping it running, and Maddie absolves him of responsibility for how it goes down.
    • Maddie, Paul, Mitraillette, and the other resistance workers hide their bikes and the car in and around Damask's house—the elderly woman the circuit is named for.
    • They take rowboats from Damask's house down the river to the bridge, which they wire to explode.
    • The bridge is mostly blown up in the explosion, as is the front of the bus—and when the German driver and guard get out, Paul and some others shoot them.
    • Two other guards get out and fire into the darkness.
    • Maddie is freaking out because she's so scared of gunfire, but Paul tells her to get it together and work on shooting up the equipment.
    • Then the guards take all the prisoners out of the bus and make them lie face down on the road.
    • The guards shoot six of the prisoners immediately in a "two for one" deal: for each German killed, they will kill two prisoners.
    • For a while there's a stalemate because no one wants to get more prisoners killed—Maddie spots Julie among those still alive.
    • The German guards make sure they don't present easy targets, while generally being jerks to the prisoners by stomping on them and/or shooting them in non-lethal places.
    • Julie starts talking to the guards, which makes one of them laugh; when he leans down to talk to her, she bites him.
    • Mitraillette tells Maddie she did it to provoke him into killing her quickly, but another guard is wise to Julie's plan and tells the first one not to shoot her.
    • When Nazi reinforcements arrive, things really start to go down—fast. And by down, we definitely mean downhill.
    • A few captives take the risk and run for it, escaping to the Resistance workers.
    • There's general pandemonium as Paul and his people start mowing down German soldiers, but then the tide turns.
    • The German soldier in charge of the situation grabs two men and Julie from the line of prisoners left on the ground and starts torturing the two men by shooting them between the legs and in the elbows.
    • After the two men are dragged back onto the bus, there's only Julie left, and Maddie bursts into very loud, distinctive sobs.
    • Julie realizes that Maddie is there and sees hope.
    • She cries, "KISS ME HARDY! Kiss me, QUICK!" (2.17.60).
    • Maddie knows what she means since they had this conversation about Admiral Nelson a long time ago.
    • Maddie shoots Julie in the head, killing her instantly.
  • Part 2, Chapter 18

    • Maddie says things continued after that.
    • Another woman is put in Julie's place and screams at them that they are just getting everyone killed.
    • The resistance workers run, and there's a firefight between Paul's people and the Germans—Paul and about half the Resistance workers are mowed down.
    • Maddie and the others make it back to the rowboats. Mitraillette takes the gun from Maddie's hands and asks if that was Verity.
    • Mitraillette, who is Paul's second-in-command, gets the five escaped prisoners and seven Resistance workers back to Damask's house, where they make everything look like it hasn't been touched in years.
    • A Nazi search party comes calling, so they hide for an hour in the rushes along the riverbank, until the groundskeeper comes back to give them the all clear, and they all divide up.
    • Mitraillette and Maddie end up sleeping in the stables with several escaped prisoners.
    • Maddie gets into a conversation with one of the prisoners, who accuses Julie of being a collaborator and says no one would have helped her eat and drink.
    • Maddie goes into a rage at this and attacks him, so Mitraillette knocks her out with drugged coffee.
    • When Maddie wakes, the chauffeur takes her up to the villa, where Damask has drawn her a bath.
    • After Maddie bathes, Damask makes her supper, but Maddie can't eat it and sobs in Damask's arms for an hour.
    • Before she leaves, Damask tells her that they have their burden in common.
    • As Maddie leaves the next day, she notices the rose gardens around the villa.
    • Maddie, Mitraillette, and Papa Thibaut's friend who owns the car are driven back to the farm by Damask's chauffeur.
    • Maddie knows the bodies are still lying where they fell and can't bear to think of Julie like that.
    • She is going to drink more of the drug and try to sleep.
    • When she wakes up she plans to look through the papers Engel delivered, which arrived in a bag of underclothes with Käthe Habicht's name on them.
  • Part 2, Chapter 19

    • Maddie discovers that the papers Engel sent are all the writing Julie did during her time in the Ormaie Gestapo.
    • She realizes Julie never told the Germans one thing of significance. She just made up fake code, and all her worry about treason and being a coward and her professions of telling the truth were a bluff.
  • Part 2, Chapter 20

    • Maddie is still reading Julie's confession.
    • Julie made up the names of airfields and got a lot of the details of Maddie's training wrong, whether by accident or on purpose.
    • Maddie doesn't remember Julie telling her the story about the aunt who shot her terminally ill husband, and she thinks it's so weird—as if Julie were trying to tell her what to do.
    • As a whole, Maddie says, as it pertains to their friendship, it's completely true, but there's nothing the Germans can use.
  • Part 2, Chapter 21

    • Maddie works out the code embedded in Julie's confession, a code Julie and Engel created together.
    • She figures out that Julie included the story about her great-aunt killing her sick husband because she knew they might have to blow up the Chateau de Bordeaux with her inside.
    • But thanks to Julie and Engel's instructions, Maddie realizes they can get all the prisoners out.
    • Maddie feels like she and Julie are still working as a team.
  • Part 2, Chapter 22

    • This is a message from the SOE in Ormaie to the SOE in London.
    • It reports Paul's and Julie's deaths and asks the RAF to create a diversion the night of December 11 to enable Operation Verity.
  • Part 2, Chapter 23

    • As it turns out, Amélie easily walks into City Hall and gets the information she needs about the Chateau de Bordeaux, which was Julie's job.
    • She leaves the 411 in Engel's drop-off spot, and when Maddie goes to pick it up she meets Engel in the café.
    • Engel asks her to go for a walk so she can tell her some things, and Maddie agrees.
    • They walk and talk, chain-smoking all the way, like people did in the 1940s. Hey, we guess their life expectancies aren't that long, anyway.
    • Engel tells Maddie about what happened when Julie was captured, how she fought, and how Engel found evidence of her real mission written on her palm and wiped it away before anyone else could see it.
    • Engel says that when Julie was done with her confession and completely worn down, Engel wrote the numbers on her own palm and asked Julie what she should do with them—speaking in code, Julie told her to blow the place up.
    • Engel advises Maddie to give up her Käthe Habicht identity and turn back into Maddie Brodatt; Maddie knows this will mean going back into hiding, but she thinks Engel is probably right.
    • Maddie says Engel reminds her in some ways of Julie when Julie was playing Eva Seiler.
    • Maddie suddenly gets angry, accusing Engel of never giving Julie any cigarettes. Engel says she did, all the time, but Julie could hardly write that down because it would have gotten them both in trouble.
    • Engel says Maddie can keep Julie's confession because the landlady told von Linden she used it to light the kitchen fire.
    • As they are about to part, Engel gives Maddie a key. It turns out Engel is the one who stole the keys—she used them to make a duplicate so the Resistance workers can get into the building easily.
    • Suddenly they run into von Linden, which causes some uncomfortable moments as Maddie pretends to be Käthe.
    • All Maddie can think about is how much she hates von Linden and how he doesn't know she holds his fate in her hands.
    • Maddie is determined to bring the Ormaie Gestapo down.
    • She watches Engel and von Linden walk away together.
  • Part 2, Chapter 24

    • Maddie has stopped using her Käthe identity and is waiting to be picked up for a flight back to England.
    • She's not trying to hide because she wakes up screaming from bad dreams anyway.
    • She feels very alone.
  • Part 2, Chapter 25

    • Maddie is back in England and is being held under lock and key in her room at the SOE headquarters.
    • She doesn't know what's going to happen, court-martial or trial and execution for Julie's murder, but she doesn't care because she feels safe and knows nothing the British will do to her can be as bad as what the Nazis would have done

    Maddie titles the next section "Incident Report No. 2."

    • Here, Maddie describes the sabotage of the Ormaie Gestapo.
    • While the RAF creates a diversion overhead and all the Nazis are hiding out in the air raid shelters, the Ormaie Resistance frees all the prisoners in the Chateau de Bordeaux and sets a bomb to go off.
    • Maddie decides to free the person held in Julie's cell, but the stench of the place nearly makes her sick.
    • A Jamaican rear gunner with the RAF is held in Julie's cell.
    • After they escape the building, he and Maddie head back to the Thibaut farm, where they hide out together in the barn until they are scheduled to meet the plane that will come to take them back to England.
    • Maddie returns to Damask's house to meet the car that will take her to the airfield.
    • Damask walks Maddie through her rose garden and tells her they were at last allowed to bury the bodies.
    • She didn't want to bury the girls in a pile with the men, so she wrapped them in her and her sister's First Communion veils and buried them in the rose garden. She clipped every rose remaining in the garden and piled them on the graves.
    • Maddie realizes that Damask is Julie's great-aunt, and Julie is buried in her grandmother's First Communion veil.
    • She doesn't think the great-aunt knows it is Julie, though, and can't bear to tell her.
    • The plane manages to land on the field this time, and the pick-up goes off without a hitch.
    • Maddie realizes the pilot is Jamie. He tells her to switch seats with him and fly herself home, and as she does, she tells him she shot Julie and why.
    • Jamie tells her she'll definitely have to fly now because he can't after hearing that.
    • As she flies them back to England, Jamie puts his hand on her shoulder and leaves it there the whole time, just as Julie did on the way to France, and she finally feels less alone.
  • Part 2, Chapter 26

    • Maddie has nearly filled up Etienne Thibaut's notebook.
    • She is taken to the debriefing room, where she meets with the Bloody Machiavellian English Intelligence Officer playing God, whom she code names Sir John Balliol.
    • She first addresses him the way she addressed von Linden—she thinks they're two sides of the same coin.
    • He asks what she's so afraid of, and she confesses to Julie's murder and says she's afraid of hanging for it.
    • Like von Linden, it turns out that the BMEIOPG does have a soft side and really is quite cut up about Julie's death.
    • He says the official record will remain "killed in action."
    • They take a break from the questioning, and during Maddie's nap she dreams Julie is teaching her to foxtrot in the kitchen at Craig Castle.
    • When the BMEIOPG returns to questioning her, Maddie asks what he's really up to, and he says he's testing her to see if she'd be okay to keep doing SOE work.
    • She's caught in a bit of a trap: the SOE wants to give her a medal, while the Air Ministry wants to take her license. If she keeps flying for the SOE, she can keep flying—she knows she'll be ferrying planes to France for the invasion in the spring, and is determined to go back.
    • Before he lets her go, the BMEIOPG passes on a message that von Linden's body has been found shot through the head in an apparent suicide.
    • Maddie thinks of Isolde and her sorrow and all the people she met and will never see again.
    • She will spend one more night in her and Julie's room at SOE headquarters.
    • She decides to keep Julie's scarf but send Julie's confession and her own notes to Julie's mother, since it is Lady Beaufort-Stuart's right to know what happened.
    • Part of her will never recover from all this.
  • Part 2, Chapter 27

    • This is a letter from Julie's mother to Maddie. It tells her she did the right thing, to fly safely, and to return to Craig Castle as Maddie is all she has left of Julie.