Study Guide

Crime and Punishment Quotes

  • Drugs and Alcohol

    Part 1, Chapter 1

    [Raskolnikov] walked along the pavement like a drunken man, regardless of the passers-by, and jostling against them, and only came to his senses when he was in the next street. (1.1.45)

    It's a good thing Raskolnikov isn't a drinker. It's also ironic that he acts like a drunk, considering how he feels about them.

    […] and the drunken men whom he met continually, although it was a working day, completed the revolting misery of the picture. (1.1.6)

    There are dozens of lines like this one to be found in Crime and Punishment. Raskolnikov does not like drunks and the first chapter, in particular, emphasizes this point.

    Part 1, Chapter 2
    Sonia (Sofya Semyonovna Marmeladov)

    [Marmeladov:] "I drink so that I may suffer twice as much!" (1.2.21)

    Marmeladov is caught in a vicious cycle of suffering and alcoholism. He drinks because he suffers. The drinking pushes his family further into poverty. This makes him feel guilty, so he drinks more and wallows in his suffering. You can see where we are going with this.

    [Marmeladov:] And here I, her own father, here I took thirty copecks of that money for a drink! And I am drinking it! And I have already drunk it!" (1.2.31)

    Marmeladov asked Sonia for money to go drinking with. Money she earned by selling her body. He knows that this kind of behavior is low, but he also knows he won't stop. It's a testament to Raskolnikov's compassion that he's so nice to the guy.

    Part 2, Chapter 6

    "She's drunk herself out of her senses," the same woman's voice wailed at her side. "Out of her senses. The other day she tried to hang herself, we cut her down." (2.6.151)

    We aren't really surprised to see suicide and alcohol abuse linked together in this brutally blunt passage. The girl in question just threw herself off a bridge when Raskolnikov was standing next to her. She lives, but for how long? Maybe she will transform like Raskolnikov…

    Part 3, Chapter 1
    Dmitri Prokofitch Razumihin

    [Razumihin:] "Then I'll run home in a twinklingI've a lot of friends there, all drunkI'll fetch Zossimovthat's the doctor who is looking after him, he is there, too, but he is not drunk; he is not drunk, he is never drunk!" (3.1.34)

    Here's a situation where the novel doesn't take an absolutely negative view on alcohol. This passage is some funny stuff coming from Razumihin. We can't help laughing. You probably remember that he finds drinking a little less amusing the next morning.

    Part 6, Chapter 1
    Dmitri Prokofitch Razumihin

    [Razumihin:] "You always have been a very rational person and you've never been mad, never," he observed suddenly with warmth. "You're right: I shall drink. Good-bye!" (6.1.22)

    This time, Razumihin doesn't go drinking. Raskolnikov convinces him that he's loved, that he needs to be there for Dounia. This "blessing" motivates Razumihin to stop drinking.

    Part 6, Chapter 4
    Arkady Ivanovitch Svidrigaïlov

    [Svidrigaïlov:] "I've drunk too much though, I see that. I was almost saying too much again. Damn the wine! Hi! there, water!" (6.4.17)

    Svidrigaïlov is so quotable. We've heard from Pulcheria that Svidrigaïlov had alcohol issues. But really, that's probably the least of his problems. Raskolnikov thinks Svidrigaïlov is being so talkative because he's had too much to drink. We bet that Svidrigaïlov isn't saying anything he doesn't want to say.

  • Suffering

    Part 1, Chapter 1
    Rodion Romanovitch Raskolnikov

    [Raskolnikov] was crushed by poverty, but the anxieties of his position had of late ceased to weigh upon him. (1.1.3)

    This shows layers of suffering. The suffering Raskolnikov is experiencing as a result of the bad idea that won't leave him alone is so great that he doesn't feel the suffering he's experiencing as a result of his poverty.

    Part 4, Chapter 4
    Rodion Romanovitch Raskolnikov

    [Raskolnikov:] "I did not bow down to you [Sonia], I bowed down to all the suffering of humanity," he said wildly and walked away to the window. (4.4.99)

    We say elsewhere that Raskolnikov isn't very romantic to Sonia. That's not entirely true. He throws himself at her feet an awful lot, though he usually follows it with this kind of comment. More importantly, this passage shows that Raskolnikov sees Sonia as a symbol of everybody's suffering.

    Part 5, Chapter 1
    Andrey Semyonovitch Lebeziatnikov

    [Andrey Semyonovitch:] "Even as it is, she was quite right: she was suffering and that was her asset, so to speak, her capital which she had a perfect right to dispose of." (5.1.26)

    Andrey Semyonovitch has a different take on Sonia's prostitution. He sees it as a practical move to alleviate suffering. The suffering of prostitution, in his mind, is better than the suffering of starvation.

    Part 5, Chapter 3
    Pyotr Petrovitch Luzhin

    [Luzhin:] "[…] immediately after your visit I found that a hundred-rouble note was missing from my table, in the room of my friend Mr. Lebeziatnikov." (5.3.5)

    If Luzhin has his way, Sonia is about to start really suffering. Fortunately, there are some decent people in this novel, not the least of whom is Andrey Semyonovitch Lebeziatnikov. Luzhin's plan backfires, and the suffering boomerangs back on him.

    Part 5, Chapter 4

    [Raskolnikov] had to tell [Sonia] who had killed Lizaveta. He knew the terrible suffering it would be to him and, as it were, brushed away the thought of it. (5.4.1)

    Raskolnikov knows that confessing, the act of speaking his crimes, causes him to sufferyet, he can't stop doing it. He needs to tell. The suffering of telling is less than the suffering of not telling.

    Part 6, Chapter 2
    Porfiry Petrovitch

    [Porfiry:] "So I suspect now that Nikolay wants to take his suffering or something of the sort." (6.2.24)

    Porfiry thinks that Nikolay is taking the rap for the murders to achieve the kind of suffering only available to the actual murderer. He blames this on Nikolay's religion, which celebrates suffering as a means to access divine love.

    [Porfiry:] "I am convinced that you will decide, 'to take your suffering.' You don't believe my words now, but you'll come to it of yourself. For suffering, Rodion Romanovitch, is a great thing." (6.2.69)

    Porfiry blames Nikolay's desire to suffer on religious fanaticism. So what is his problem? Legal fanaticism? Doesn't he also sound like an echo of Raskolnikov, and of Sonia? Many of the characters believe that suffering is the chief means for purification.

    Part 6, Chapter 5
    Arkady Ivanovitch Svidrigaïlov

    [Svidrigaïlov:] "He has suffered a great deal and is still suffering from the idea that he could make a theory, but was incapable of boldly overstepping the law, and so he is not a man of genius." (6.5.60)

    This is Svidrigaïlov telling Dounia why Raskolnikov killed and why he is suffering from it. Sounds pretty accurate to us. What do you think?

    Part 6, Chapter 8
    Rodion Romanovitch Raskolnikov

    [Raskolnikov:] "They say it is necessary for me to suffer! What's the object of these senseless sufferings? Shall I know any better what they are for, when I am crushed by hardships and idiocy, and weak as an old man after twenty years' penal servitude?" (6.8.75)

    Here, Raskolnikov is questioning the high premium everybody places on suffering as he debates whether or not to turn himself in and submit to prison. Also notice that he thinks he'll get at least 20 years in prison, but he only gets eight.

    Epilogue, Part 2

    But these recollections scarcely troubled [Raskolnikov] now; he knew with what infinite love he would now repay all her sufferings. (Epilogue.2.26)

    Now, that's better. It looks like Raskolnikov is finally going to stop adding to Sonia's misery and start subtracting from it.

  • The Home

    Part 1, Chapter 1
    Rodion Romanovitch Raskolnikov

    "I want to attempt a thing like that and am frightened by these trifles," [Raskolnikov] thought, with an odd smile. (1.1.5)

    Of course, Raskolnikov is referring to his murderous idea. Part of what his mixed-up brain wants to do is overstep his fears of the landlady, to reach a place where he is in power, either literally or by becoming fearless.

    [Raskolnikov] was hopelessly in debt to his landlady, and was afraid of meeting her. (1.1.2)

    Right away, the novel digs into one of our deepest fears: the landlady, or landlord as the case may be. Since it's only been a few years since the serfs were emancipated, and since the serfs were "owned" by people who also owned land, landperson phobia was probably extremely acute in Russia.

    Part 1, Chapter 2
    Katerina Ivanovna Marmeladov

    [Marmeladov:] "Allow me to ask you another question out of simple curiosity: have you ever spent a night on a hay barge, on the Neva?" (1.2.7)

    Marmeladov tells Raskolnikov that his home life is so unbearable that he had to leave and sleep outdoors. It's obvious from what he says that the horror of his home is of his own making. He knows it, too. He just doesn't know how to turn things around.

    Part 4, Chapter 4
    Rodion Romanovitch Raskolnikov

    "On a broken chair stood a candle in a battered copper candlestick." (4.4.4)

    This is the first thing Raskolnikov sees when he enters Sonia's home. Notice how both the chair and the candlestick are rather beaten up? Dostoevsky really wants to emphasize Sonia's poor living conditions.

    Part 5, Chapter 3

    "Thief! Out of my lodging. Police, police!" yelled Amalia Ivanovna. "They must to Siberia be sent! Away!" (5.3.30)

    The funny phrasing is the translator's interpretation of Dostoevsky's impression of how German immigrants to Russia speak. But we digress. Here we see another landlady, but a more vicious one. Katerina asked for it, to be sure, but was also provoked. Like Raskolnikov, Katerina wants to be free from the landlady. As we know, this decision leads to Katerina's death and to a traumatic experience for her kids.

    Part 6, Chapter 6
    Arkady Ivanovitch Svidrigaïlov

    "Ugh! hang it! I believe it's a mouse," [Svidrigaïlov] thought, "that's the veal I left on the table." (6.6.37)

    Svidrigaïlov's final "home" before he kills himself is the worst hotel room ever. It seems to mirror his cracked state.

    Epilogue, Part 2

    Seven years, only seven years! At the beginning of their happiness at some moments they were both ready to look on those seven years as though they were seven days. (Epilogue.2.29)

    This passage suggests that Raskolnikov and Sonia find a home in each other. As long as they are together, they will feel secure.

    Arkady Ivanovitch Svidrigaïlov

    [Svidrigaïlov:] "I will put those two little ones and Polenka into some good orphan asylum, and I will settle fifteen hundred roubles to be paid to each on coming of age, so that Sofya Semyonovna need have no anxiety about them." (5.5.93)

    This gives us the willies. Would you trust Svidrigaïlov with your children's futures? Sonia almost has to do it. She really doesn't have the means to raise three kids. We can only hope that this is one of Svidrigaïlov's "good deeds" and he found a nice place for them. Either way, their home lives are about to change, for better or worse.

  • Criminality

    Part 1, Chapter 1
    Rodion Romanovitch Raskolnikov

    "I want to attempt a thing like that and am frightened by these trifles," [Raskolnikov] thought, with an odd smile. (1.1.5)

    This is the first time we hear about Raskolnikov's bad idea. Even though most people already know the book is about a murder before they read it, it's still creepy and mysterious.

    [Raskolnikov] was positively going now for a "rehearsal" of his project, and at every step his excitement grew more and more violent. (1.1.9)

    Uh-oh. He really sounds like a criminal here. Depending on the crime, rehearsing can get you into almost as much trouble as actually committing it.

    [Marmeladov:] "She walked straight up to Katerina Ivanovna and she laid thirty roubles on the table before her in silence." (1.1.21)

    This is how Marmeladov describes Sonia's return from her first prostitution job. Though prostitution wasn't illegal in Russia during this time, Katerina and Marmeladov are committing a moral crime against Sonia by forcing her to do it.

    Part 1, Chapter 4
    Rodion Romanovitch Raskolnikov

    "Hey! You Svidrigaïlov! What do you want here?" [Raskolnikov] shouted, clenching his fists and laughing, spluttering with rage. (1.4.14)

    Raskolnikov (and the readers) have only heard about Svidrigaïlov by this time. Raskolnikov calling the sketchy man in the park "Svidrigaïlov" foreshadows his presence in St. Petersburg and prepares us for his nastiness.

    Part 1, Chapter 6

    "Kill her, take her money and with the help of it devote oneself to the service of humanity and the good of all. What do you think, would not one tiny crime be wiped out by thousands of good deeds?" (1.6.14)

    This isn't Raskolnikov talking but rather another student. The passage simply states the complicated question posed over and over in the novel. What do you think? Can killing ever be justified? If so, when and why? If not, why not?

    Part 1, Chapter 7

    Fear gained more and more mastery over him, especially after this second, quite unexpected murder. (1.7.28)

    We wonder how this book would have turned out if Raskolnikov hadn't killed Lizaveta. Since Raskolnikov is partially inspired by his desire to protect Lizaveta from Alyona's beatings, it's extremely ironic that he ends up killing her, too.

    Part 3, Chapter 5
    Rodion Romanovitch Raskolnikov

    [Raskolnikov:] "I […] hinted that an 'extraordinary' man has the right […] an inner right to decide in his own conscience to overstep...certain obstacles, and only in case it is essential for the practical fulfillment of his idea (sometimes, perhaps, of benefit to the whole of humanity)." (3.5.101)

    This is a more complicated-sounding version of what Raskolnikov hears the student say in the quote above from 1.6.14. This is when he's trying to explain his article on the matter to Porfiry. Knowing that he wrote an essay about this business helps us understand just how obsessed he really is with the idea.

    Part 4, Chapter 4

    All that infamy had obviously only touched her mechanically, not one drop of real depravity had penetrated to [Sonia's] heart; [Raskolnikov] saw that. (4.4.104)

    Not only does Raskolnikov assume that Sonia does her work in a machine-like way, with no feeling, he implies that prostitution, something one does with one's own body, can actually have an impact on the "heart," by which he really means "soul." A moment later, he suggests that, if she stays a prostitute, she will go crazy, kill herself, or start to enjoy it. In other words, if she keeps it up, she'll lose her soul. He sees her as a criminal, even though she doesn't see him as one.

  • Education

    Part 1, Chapter 2
    Sonia (Sofya Semyonovna Marmeladov)

    [Marmeladov:] "[…] but Katerina Ivanovna, my spouse, is a person of education and an officer's daughter." (1.2.18)

    The narrator tells us later that Katerina's education is what allows her to maintain a certain "dignity" and pride through all of her trials and tribulations. The suggestion is that education has value beyond helping one get that dream job. It can also be a source of sustenance. We don't know if Katerina is the best character to demonstrate that point.

    Part 1, Chapter 3

    [..] a painted table in the corner on which lay a few manuscripts and books; the dust that lay thick upon them showed that they had been long untouched. (1.3.1)

    Aha! Proof that Raskolnikov hasn't been doing his homework and evidence that he's dropped out of school. Dostoevsky belabors this point so we understand that education is a big issue here.

    Part 3, Chapter 3
    Dounia (Avdotya Romanovna Raskolnikov)

    [Dounia:] "Pyotr Petrovitch [Luzhin] makes no secret of the fact that he had a cheap education, he is proud indeed of having made his own way." (3.3.124)

    Did you find it odd that Dounia has a better education than Luzhin, yet she can't get a decent job and he can? This is because very few professional positions were open to women in Russia (and elsewhere) in the 1860s.

    Part 4, Chapter 3
    Dmitri Prokofitch Razumihin

    [Razumihin:] "And the great point of the business is that we shall know just what wants translating, and we shall be translating, publishing, learning all at once." (4.3.28)

    We love Razumihin's energy. Even though he dropped out of college, he knows multiple languages and is very business savvy. Do you think he's reached the point where he doesn't need the structure of school to guide his studies?

    Part 4, Chapter 4

    But at the same time he knew now and knew for certain that, although it filled her with dread and suffering, yet she had a tormenting desire to read and to read to him that he might hear it, and to read now whatever might come of it! (4.4.157)

    What a confusing sentence. What seems to be going on is Raskolnikov's reading of Sonia's mind. She is terrified of reading to him but very badly wants to do so. She wants to help him with his religious education. But, remember when she tells Raskolnikov how much she loved reading to her dad? Since Raskolnikov was one of her father's only friends at the end of his life, she can also share in mourning her father by reading to Raskolnikov.

    Part 6, Chapter 8

    [The Explosive Lieutenant:] "Then these midwives, too, have become extraordinarily numerous." (6.8.58)

    Oh, Explosive Lieutenant, don't be so hard on women. Why does Raskolnikov want to confess to this guy, anyway? The first time he meets him, he complains that students and authors are horrible people. In this section, he spends lots of time making fun of women for trying to create better opportunities for themselves. He does admit that maybe there aren't quite enough jobs for women.

    Epilogue, Part 2

    Life had stepped into the place of theory and something quite different would work itself out in his mind. (Epilogue.2.26)

    This passage could be seen as an argument that Raskolnikov had too much education. He was so focused on ideas and theories that he confused himself right out of happiness. Adapt this sentence to use on your teacher next time you forget your homework.

  • Religion

    Part 1, Chapter 2
    Sonia (Sofya Semyonovna Marmeladov)

    [Marmeladov:] "I ought to be crucified, crucified on a cross, not pitied! Crucify me, oh judge, crucify me but pity me!" (1.2.36)

    Like many of the characters in this novel, Marmeladov thinks that if he can suffer like Christ, he might be purified. At first, he says he doesn't want pity, just crucifixion. Then, he says he wants both. This strikes us as a very human emotion. If we have to suffer, we want others to feel a little bad for us while we are doing it.

    Part 1, Chapter 4

    Bitter is the ascent to Golgotha. (1.4.1)

    Golgotha is where Christ is thought to have been crucified. In this snippet from Raskolnikov's brain, he's comparing Dounia to Christ. He thinks she's sacrificing herself to Luzhin to pay for Raskolnikov's "sins."

    Part 1, Chapter 7

    Raskolnikov thrust it in his pocket without looking at it, flung the crosses on the old woman's body and rushed back into the bedroom, this time taking the axe with him. (1.7.23)

    Gothic moment! The pawnbroker is lying in a pool of her own blood. The symbols of Christianity juxtaposed with images of evil, as if in challenge. If you are into this, check out Flannery O'Connor's stories, such as "A Good Man is Hard to Find."

    Part 3, Chapter 5
    Rodion Romanovitch Raskolnikov

    "And...and do you believe in God? Excuse my curiosity."

    "I do," repeated Raskolnikov, raising his eyes to Porfiry. (3.5.104-5)

    This is part of the reason we question Raskolnikov's "religious conversion" at the end of the novel. He claims he was already religious. He also tells Porfiry he believes in the story of Lazarus "literally." Even though he doesn't think God can or will solve any problems for him, there is much proof that he has many religious experiments way before the ending.

    Part 4, Chapter 4
    Sonia (Sofya Semyonovna Marmeladov)

    [Sonia, reading:] "And when He thus had spoken, He cried with a loud voice, Lazarus, come forth.

    "And he that was dead came forth." (4.4.183-184)

    Lazarus is almost as important to Raskolnikov as Napoleon is. It gets pretty bizarre. If he can be a Lazarus, he can be reanimated, awakened from the death of his life.

    Part 6, Chapter 8

    He knelt down in the middle of the square, bowed down to the earth, and kissed that filthy earth with bliss and rapture. (6.8.27)

    This is another pre-epilogue moment of religious experience for Raskolnikov. According to Sonia's instructions, he's supposed to tell everybody he's a murder after he bows down. But he can't because the heckling begins as soon as his knees touch the ground.

    Epilogue, Part 2

    [Raskolnikov] had never talked to them about God nor his belief, but they wanted to kill him as an infidel. (Epilogue.2.15)

    "Infidel" is also sometimes translated as "atheist." The other prisoners also seem to dislike Raskolnikov because of the nature of his crime. Likely, they assumed he has to be an atheist to do what he did. But, maybe they think he's an atheist because of the way he treats Sonia, whom they all adore. Interestingly, they learn to accept Raskolnikov when he learns to accept Sonia.

    How it happened [Raskolnikov] did not know. But all at once something seemed to seize him and fling him at [Sonia's] feet. He wept and threw his arms round her knees. (Epilogue.2.22)

    We aren't sure if this is a religious moment or not. We aren't quite sure what's going on. Does some invisible force lift him up and toss him on the ground? All we know is Raskolnikov is extremely moved. Whether it's love, religion, or some kind of muscle spasm that moves him, we do not know. Whatever it is, we like it.

  • Violence

    Part 1, Chapter 2

    For that's Katerina Ivanovna's character, and when children cry, even from hunger, she falls to beating them at once. (1.2.21)

    Even though we get dozens of lines like this about Katerina, she remains a somewhat sympathetic character. Part of this is because her kids, and a few others, remain loyal to her and seem to love her. Her abuse is considered a symptom of her illness and her poverty and, thus, not entirely monstrous.

    Part 1, Chapter 3
    Katerina Ivanovna Marmeladov

    [Katerina:] "Mercy on us, can he have drunk it all? There were twelve silver roubles left in the chest!" and in a fury she seized him by the hair and dragged him into the room. (1.3.49)

    Many of the violent moments in the novel involve Katerina. Sure, she has a right to be mad about the stolen money, but it's painful to read about her treatment of her husband nonetheless. It's also darkly comic. We are angry with Marmeladov for not being stronger, and we want something to wake him to the reality of it. He himself thinks the hair pulling might help.

    Part 1, Chapter 5

    She was a complete slave and went in fear and trembling of her sister, who made her work day and night, and even beat her. (1.5.65)

    This is what Raskolnikov overhears the other student saying in the bar about Lizaveta and the pawnbroker. Man, it seems like there are lots of beatings being administered in this novel. This passage is pretty effective in arousing our sympathy for Lizaveta and our disgust for the pawnbroker. It makes us take Lizaveta's death much harder than we would have if we hadn't known of the abuse.

    The blow fell; the mare staggered, sank back, tried to pull, but the bar fell again with a swinging blow on her back and she fell on the ground like a log. (1.5.45)

    This is from Raskolnikov's famous horse dream. When he wakes from it, he decides not to kill Alyona. In his mind, for a moment, he thinks of her as his innocent victim and wants to save her from himself.

    Part 1, Chapter 7

    Then [Raskolnikov] dealt [Alyona] another and another blow with the blunt side and on the same spot. The blood gushed as from an overturned glass, the body fell back. (1.7.22)

    An incredibly graphic moment. Dostoevsky's word choice is interesting here, too. He compares the body to a "glass." This speaks to Raskolnikov's vision of her as a mere object rather than a human being.

    Part 2, Chapter 3

    […] she was beseeching, no doubt, not to be beaten, for she was being mercilessly beaten on the stairs. (2.3.51)

    What a creepy moment. We knew Ilya was "explosive," but why would he beat Raskolnikov's landlady? Is it because of the story Raskolnikov told him at the police station? Did Raskolnikov somehow cause this? Well, only in his dreams. It never happens, but it sure seems real when we read it.

    Part 3, Chapter 6

    He was overcome with frenzy and he began hitting the old woman on the head with all his force, but at every blow of the axe the laughter and whispering from the bedroom grew louder. (3.6.62)

    Major anxiety dream. Even if Raskolnikov could legally get away with the murder, his mind will keep on punishing him. We wonder how long such dreams will continue.

    Part 4, Chapter 2
    Pyotr Petrovitch Luzhin

    [Pyotr Petrovitch Luzhin:] "Resslich hated this girl, and grudged her every crust; she used to beat her mercilessly. One day the girl was found hanging in the garret. At the inquest the verdict was suicide." (4.2.41)

    We don't blame you for shuddering. The girl in question is only 14. By Svidrigaïlov's own later admission, he sexually abused her, which caused her to kill herself.

    Part 6, Chapter 5

    Dounia raised the revolver, and deadly pale, gazed at [Svidrigaïlov], measuring the distance and awaiting the first movement on his part. (6.5.106)

    What a relief this moment is. We can't imagine how Dounia will get away from Svidrigaïlov, but she's saved by the gun, just in the nick of time. Dounia doesn't take advantage of the situation, just nicks his forehead to make a point (or she's just a bad shot). In any case, he won't be so lucky when he turns the same gun on himself.

  • Love

    Part 1, Chapter 3

    Good-bye, till we meet then—I embrace you warmly, warmly, with many kisses.

    Yours till death, PULCHERIA RASKOLNIKOV. (1.3.38)

    Pulcheria really loves her son. Her sign-off speaks to this love and cruelly foreshadows her death, to which her grief over his act contributes. A big part of her identity is her success as a parent. When she learns of the murders, that identity is shattered.

    Part 2, Chapter 7
    Rodion Romanovitch Raskolnikov

    [Raskolnikov:] "I've just been kissed by someone who, if I had killed anyone, would just the same...in fact I saw someone else there...with a flame-coloured feather." (2.7.135)

    The kiss was from Polenka, Sonia's sister. This is not a Svidrigaïlov moment, mind you. Raskolnikov expresses deep concern for Polenka many times. The passage also comments on the big impression Sonia makes on him the first time he sees her.

    Part 5, Chapter 1
    Pyotr Petrovitch Luzhin

    [Luzhin:] "Am I to get married simply for the sake of the furniture?" (5.1.2)

    This is a pretty funny line. We can almost empathize with Luzhin at this moment. He's gone to some trouble to set up a nice home for Dounia. Too bad he wants her there as his slave.

    Part 6, Chapter 4
    Arkady Ivanovitch Svidrigaïlov

    [Svidrigaïlov:] "[…] I was in the debtors' prison here, for an immense sum, and had not any expectation of being able to pay it." (6.4.1)

    This doesn't sound like it belongs under "love." But, as we know, Marfa paid off the debt Svidrigaïlov is talking about. Whatever we think of her, she was in love with him, though her feelings probably changed considerably before she died.

    Epilogue, Part 1

    [Razumihin and Dounia] were continually making plans for the future; both counted on settling in Siberia within five years at least. (Epilogue.1.13)

    This is one of the novel's more heartwarming moments. Razumihin and Dounia seem to be a genuinely loving couple. We feel good about their union. The passage also comments on the deep love they both have for Raskolnikov, which is a big part of what binds them together.

    Epilogue, Part 2
    Rodion Romanovitch Raskolnikov

    [Raskolnikov and Sonia] were renewed by love; the heart of each held infinite sources of life for the heart of the other. (Epilogue.2.23)

    Wow. Isn't that a contrast to the rest of the novel? This is what we all want. In some ways, love between Raskolnikov and Sonia seems impossible, even though their attraction is undeniable. This ending makes love seem possible for almost anybody.

    Rodion Romanovitch Raskolnikov

    [Raskolnikov:] "For one [Dounia] loves, for one she adores, she will sell herself!" (1.4.5)

    Here, Raskolnikov is referring to Dounia, but he underestimates her. Although Dounia does think Luzhin can help Raskolnikov, once she knows what Luzhin's true intentions are, she calls it off. Raskolnikov's love for her certainly makes this easier.

  • Justice and Judgment

    Part 1, Chapter 6

    "You are talking and speechifying away, but tell me, would you kill the old woman yourself?"

    "Of course not! I was only arguing the justice of it […]."

    "But I think, if you would not do it yourself, there's no justice about it […]." (1.6.19-21)

    Imagine how Raskolnikov must have felt when he overheard this conversation! He takes it as a call to action, a call to "justice." It seems bizarre to see "kill" and "justice" used together this way. On a larger scale, is that the whole idea behind war? Killing in the name of, among other things, justice?

    Part 2, Chapter 1
    Rodion Romanovitch Raskolnikov

    [Raskolnikov:] "Surely it isn't beginning already! Surely it isn't my punishment coming upon me? It is!" (2.1.17)

    This is just after the murder, when Raskolnikov is obsessing over possible evidence of his crime. The phrasing "coming upon me" suggests two interpretations of the passage: 1) that the beginning phase of Raskolnikov's punishment is being meted out by a force of justice, perhaps God and 2) that Raskolnikov is personifying punishment as a force of justice in and of itself.

    Part 4, Chapter 2

    […] it rested with him to punish them and there would always be time for that. (4.2.22)

    When Luzhin says this in reference to Dounia and her mother, the gig is pretty much up. Our judgment of Luzhin is pretty negative. Luzhin is also one of the novel's most judgmental characters, as our quote demonstrates.

    Dounia (Avdotya Romanovna Raskolnikov)

    [Dounia:] "Trust me in this matter and, believe me, I shall be capable of judging impartially." (4.2.69)

    We believe you, Dounia! She wasn't quite so impartial when judging Svidrigaïlov and it got her in a heap of trouble, but she gives Luzhin every chance to pretend to be a decent guy before she kicks him to the curb.

    Part 5, Chapter 3
    Pyotr Petrovitch Luzhin

    [Luzhin:] "On the contrary, you'll have to answer, gentlemen, for violently obstructing the course of justice." (5.3.70)

    Even though Sonia is judged innocent of Luzhin's accusations due to Andrey Semyonovitch's sharp eyes and fearless tongue, there isn't justice for Sonia, and Luzhin doesn't have to suffer for his crime. Nonetheless, it is probably the closest thing to a feel-good moment we get in the novel. It might not give us full-blown justice but perhaps, at least, a hope of justice.

    Part 5, Chapter 4
    Katerina Ivanovna Marmeladov

    "Good God!" [Katerina] cried with flashing eyes, "is there no justice upon earth? Whom should you protect if not us orphans?" (5.4.76)

    The novel is obsessed with the lack of justice for children, particularly orphans, as is Raskolnikov. This is a sentiment to which we can all relate. So long as children are suffering in the world, it's hard to think of it as a place where fairness and justice have meaning.

    Part 6, Chapter 2

    [Porfiry:] "You must fulfill the demands of justice. I know that you don't believe it, but indeed, life will bring you through. You will live it down in time. What you need now is fresh air, fresh air, fresh air!" (6.2.62)

    The fresh air in question is the fresh air of hard labor in a Siberian prison camp, which does seem to do Raskolnikov some good. What we find interesting about this passage is that Porfiry is trying to convince Raskolnikov that this process of criminal justice will provide him with personal justicea chance to start a new life.

    Part 6, Chapter 4
    Marfa Petrovna Svidrigaïlov

    [Svidrigaïlov:] "But to judge some people impartially we must renounce certain preconceived opinions and our habitual attitude to the ordinary people about us." (6.4.1)

    There is some truth in this, but because it comes from Svidrigaïlov, we shudder. He makes Dounia's "judging impartially" look like kid stuff. LiterallySvidrigaïlov is asking Raskolnikov to "impartially" judge him and his crimes against women, children, and his servant. Somebody better call a defense lawyer quick. We are in deep water.

    Part 6, Chapter 8
    Ilya Petrovitch

    [Ilya:] "Look at these suicides, too, how common they are, you can't fancy!" (6.8.60)

    This, of course, is Ilya to Raskolnikov on Svidrigaïlov's suicide. It's also a comment on the constant array of suicidal tendencies in the novel. Suicide is presented as a judgment by an individual of both himself or herself and the society in which he or she lives.

    Epilogue, Part 1

    It was only in that that he [Raskolnikov] recognised his criminality, only in the fact that he had been unsuccessful and had confessed it. (Epilogue.1.7)

    Raskolnikov never explicitly says he regrets his pre-prison actions, though there is plenty of evidence to argue an implied regret. Either way, at this moment Raskolnikov is still dehumanizing Alyona and Lizaveta by stating his failure to bring positive meaning to the murders and that his act of confessing made the murders crimes and thus himself a criminal. He doesn't judge the two women as humans.

  • Versions of Reality

    Part 2, Chapter 3

    But of thatof that he [Raskolnikov] had no recollection, and yet every minute he felt that he had forgotten something he ought to remember. He worried and tormented himself trying to remember. (2.3.1)

    When Raskolnikov wakes up from his illness, his reality is extremely confused. He's forgotten what we might assume he'd rather forget. But here we see that forgetting is actually causing him pain. Raskolnikov really wants to see life clearly. It's just that everything is so confusing that he can't sort it out.

    Part 3, Chapter 2

    He [Razumihin] brought his fist down heavily on the kitchen stove, hurt his hand and sent one of the bricks flying. (3.2.1)

    This is Razumihin's "morning after" moment. Even though we didn't see him do anything so awful, he beats himself up for talking too much and too crudely while drunk. He's also embarrassed about being drunk in front of Dounia. His reality while drunk conflicts with his reality while sober.

    Part 3, Chapter 6

    He [Raskolnikov] lost consciousness; it seemed strange to him that he didn't remember how he got into the street. It was late evening. The twilight had fallen and the full moon was shining more and more brightly; but there was a peculiar breathlessness in the air. (3.6.62)

    This is right before Raskolnikov relives the murder in his nightmares. Dostoevsky's dream sequences seem both realistic and totally exaggerated. He's really good at scary dreams.

    Part 4, Chapter 3

    And, of course, too, [Pyotr Petrovitch Luzhin] did love Dounia in his own way; he already possessed her in his dreamsand all at once! No! The next day, the very next day, it must all be set right, smoothed over, settled. (4.3.3)

    Luzhin needs a reality check, big time. Here he even admits that his fantasy or "dream" Dounia is nothing like the reality. That's dramatic irony in action. While we are aware that this is not facing reality, Luzhin isn't. Dostoevsky shows him, though, by soon removing him completely from the novel with no explanation.

    Part 4, Chapter 4
    Rodion Romanovitch Raskolnikov

    "But, perhaps, there is no God at all," Raskolnikov answered with a sort of malignance, laughed and looked at her. (4.4.93)

    This is in response to Sonia's insistence that "God" won't let Polenka become a prostitute. Believing or not believing in God are versions of individual reality. Raskolnikov sometimes believes in God and sometimes doesn't.

    Part 6, Chapter 6

    And she had destroyed herself, crushed by an insult that had appalled and amazed that childish soul, had smirched that angel purity with unmerited disgrace and torn from her a last scream of despair. (6.6.39)

    While Raskolnikov revisits his crimes only occasionally, we get the idea that Svidrigaïlov's nightmares are becoming more and more his reality. On top of that, he's seeing ghosts of the people he abused and of Marfa, whom he probably murdered. This quote refers to the young girl he drove to suicide.

    Epilogue, Part 2

    But that is the beginning of a new storythe story of the gradual renewal of a man, the story of his gradual regeneration, of his passing from one world into another. (Epilogue.2.30)

    Usually when we hear about "passing from one world into another," it's in reference to somebody dying. Here, it's as if Raskolnikov's life before was a kind of death and through love (and suffering), he is finally born.