Study Guide

Interview with the Vampire Hate

By Anne Rice

Hate

"Consumed with hatred, [Lestat] looked back. Consumed with envy, nothing pleased him unless he could take it from others." (1.189)

Louis sees Lestat as a creature consumed by hatred and envy. We wonder if these two things go hand in hand. Couldn't envy be seen as hatred for what others have and you don't? Or hatred toward yourself for lacking something you want? Either way, Lestat will do what it takes to get what he wants.

"I positively loathed Lestat." (1.210)

We start to see Louis's hatred of Lestat more and more over the course of the novel, until it just dips into pity at the end. One of the first things that really rankles Louis is the episode early in the novel when Lestat can't bring himself to kill his own father and has Louis do it for him. It's difficult to tell if Louis hates Lestat because he's barbaric, because he's cowardly, or both.

"She grew cold to Lestat." (1.441)

Time to add Claudia as a member of the I-Hate-Lestat club. The more things he keeps from her, the more she hates him. We think if he were just honest with her, and told her "I don't know," then she might be more forgiving toward him.

"'I hate you both!'" (1.487)

Well, now she hates them both. When Claudia finds out that Louis killed her, and Lestat vamped her, she—rightfully, we'd say—flips out at them both. She ends up killing Lestat. Does she ever truly forgive Louis?

"'Locked together in hatred,' she said to me calmly afterwards." (1.493)

You might have heard that the enemy of your enemy is your friend. This kind of applies to Louis and Claudia because, despite the fact that Claudia claims to despise Louis, she hates Lestat more and is thereby joined with Louis in hatred for Lestat.

"'I want to kill [Lestat]. I will enjoy it!'" (1.533)

Many murders take place in a fit of passion, and the murderer might feel remorse afterwards. Not Claudia. She hates Lestat so much she'll gleefully do it. She looks forward to it. The question is whether this is because of the depth of her hatred, or the depth of her cold, evil, vampire nature.

"'I don't like them. [...] I've searched for them the world over, and I despise them!'" (3.231)

Poor Claudia can't get a break. After finding the European vampires, Claudia realizes they're not going to share their secrets with her. They don't trust her, and they have no qualms about killing a vampire they don't trust. Hmm… they're kind of like her in that regard, don't you think?

"'If you knew how [Armand] drinks death you'd hate him more than you ever hated Lestat.'" (3.248)

Claudia hates Armand because he's trying to steal Louis away from her. Here she's trying to manipulate Louis into hating Armand, too. The irony is that she's right. If Louis could stop being blinded by love for more than a few minutes, he might see how evil Armand really is.

"'Lestat I never loved. But you! The measure of my hatred is that love. They are the same! You know now how much I hate you!'" (3.311)

There's a fine line between love and hate, and it seems that Claudia walks that tightrope when it comes to Louis. Maybe to her, both love and hate are basically the same, since they're the only emotions she's capable of feeling.

"The only emotion of which I was still capable: hatred of self." (3.382)

Once Louis gets over hating Lestat, all that hateful energy has to be turned somewhere else. Since Louis pretty much becomes Lestat by the end of the book, it's no wonder he starts hating himself even more.